Psychologist Chris Cheers Shares The Strategies You Need To Deal With The Lockdown In Australia

A leading psychologist has revealed why the biggest mistake people make during lockdown is listening to friends and family online and on social media, rather than by voice over the phone.

Hi Chris, from Melbourne, said “listening well” is the best thing someone can do to help support their loved ones during the lockdown in New South Wales, Victoria or South Australia.

Yet many of us don’t pick up the phone enough to communicate with friends and family.

Leading psychologist has revealed why the biggest mistake people make during lockdown is listening to friends and family online and on social media (Chris Cheers pictured)

“We do better with vocal listening than online.  Listening and empathy are two very difficult things to do on social media, ”said Chris (stock image)

“We do better with vocal listening than online. Listening and empathy are two very difficult things to do on social media, ”said Chris (stock image)

LISTEN ON THE PHONE

“Listening is the most important thing you can do for someone,” Chris said during an appearance on the ABC podcast, 7h00, this week.

“We do better with vocal listening than online. Listening and empathy are two very difficult things to do on social media.

The psychologist recommended that we “reintroduce the idea of ​​voice” into our lockdown conversations with people, as it “adds a real sense of connection”.

“Contact someone on the phone and try to listen to them and be guided by them because you never know what someone’s experience is with COVID,” Chris told podcast hosts.

Everyone’s experience of the pandemic has been different, he added, and it helps to know that there is someone on the other end of the phone, who listens and values ​​what you say.

“Bubble baths are adorable, but I’m trying to say that taking care of yourself also means setting boundaries, saying no and asking for what you need,” Chris said (stock image)

REMEMBER THAT SOFT BATHS ARE NOT BATHS

Chris, like some 14 million Australians, is currently locked up in Melbourne.

He said he was still “triggered” by the idea of ​​daily press conferences, case numbers and exhibition sites a year after Melbourne’s exhausting 15-week lockdown in 2020.

But during this time he developed a few strategies to help himself and others cope.

“Bubble baths are adorable, but I’m trying to say that taking care of yourself also means setting boundaries, saying no and asking for what you need,” Chris said on his Instagram pages.

“It’s important to remember that taking care of yourself isn’t always fun right now, because it’s about putting self-care above others.”

He recommends saying no sometimes and says you’ll feel better in the long run.

One of the most useful strategies the psychologist has developed over the past year is the idea that COVID-19 is a storm, and that one day it will pass (stock image)

One of the most useful strategies the psychologist has developed over the past year is the idea that COVID-19 is a storm, and that one day it will pass (stock image

ANCHOR YOURSELF AND IT WILL HAPPEN

One of the most useful strategies the psychologist has developed over the past year is the idea that COVID-19 is a storm, and that one day it will pass.

“A general statement that I developed last year that concerned people was the idea that in times of uncertainty we can think of this time of COVID-19 and lockdowns as a storm,” Chris said. at ABC.

“So right now we’re in this savage storm and it’s out of our control.”

He said when you’re in a storm you usually don’t stand outside and try to weather the storm or tell it to go away.

Instead, you “anchor” inside “like a ship and wait for it to pass”.

Try to do the same with the pandemic, even if you sometimes feel like it will never end.

RECOGNIZE A SENSE OF LOSS

Finally, Chris said that it is important to realize that you are experiencing loss right now and that you will be going through the various stages of grieving.

“You are experiencing loss, which is why you go through the stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression,” he posted on Instagram.

“The problem is that the losses are continuous and indefinite, it is difficult to reach the final stage of acceptance.”

With that, Chris recommends trying to ‘define’ the specific loss you’re dealing with right now and make it as specific as possible:

“This will make acceptance easier to achieve,” he added.

To learn more about Chris Cheers and follow him on Instagram, you can visit his profile here.



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