Psychologist Sabina Read Reveals Workplace ‘Red Flags’ You Should Be Aware Of


During an interview for a job, psychologist Sabina Read (pictured) said it was important for applicants to ask questions about the job and the work culture.

Micro-management, a high workload and taking on multiple roles are some of the top “red flags” in the workplace that are of greatest concern to Australians when they start a new role.

In an interview for a position, psychologist Sabina Read from the SEEK job market said it was important for applicants to ask questions about the work culture.

“If you enjoy working in niche or specialist roles then the buyer should be careful if you are asked to take on a wide variety of tasks or be a jack of all trades,” she said.

“And if you value time away from your job, then taking on a new role that’s heavy on overtime or off-duty can be a disaster for you.”

According to a study conducted by SEEK, more than half (51%) of respondents would not even have accepted the role if they had seen these red flags during the interview process.

1. Micro-management

Of the 500 people surveyed by SEEK, 31 percent saw micromanagement as the first red flag to watch out for.

Micro-management is a term used to describe when a boss or senior employee closely monitors workers to make sure the job gets done.

Ms Read said this type of management can “lessen the effort and pride” that workers inject into tasks and can leave them feeling controlled, suspicious, unfulfilled and dissatisfied.

“Some of us might start to wonder why we were offered the job if our manager needs to be involved every step of the way,” she said.

“We’re programmed to learn, challenge and grow – and micromanaging can alleviate those needs, or even lead to resignation for some. “

2. Wearing too many “hats” within the organization

You should consider how often you are asked to take on tasks or responsibilities beyond their job description as this can negatively impact your workload and stress level.

31 percent of employees think wearing too many “hats” at work is just as bad as being micromanaged.

“If you are constantly taking on additional tasks that are not contributing to your growth or development, it could negatively impact your ability to focus on the current role and the career goals you have set for yourself,” said Mrs. Read.

“What matters most is that you make an informed decision about the scope of your role, rather than being pulled in a direction that doesn’t match your vision.”

Micro-management is a term used to describe when a boss or senior employee closely monitors workers to make sure the job gets done.  Ms Read said this type of management can 'reduce the effort and pride' workers put into tasks (stock image)

Micro-management is a term used to describe when a boss or senior employee closely monitors workers to make sure the job is done. Ms Read said this type of management can ‘reduce the effort and pride’ workers put into tasks (stock image)

3. Absence of boundaries between personal and professional life

With more and more people working from home, the boundaries between work and personal life often become blurred.

Ms Read said the increased reliance on mobile technology creates pressure to be ‘always on’ more than ever, which can cause workers to resent, erode, overwhelm and overwhelm. risk being exhausted.

Among those polled by SEEK, 22% believe that the lack of boundaries between personal and professional life is another red flag in the workplace.

4. A culture of high performance

When we work in a high performance culture, we can expect to go above and beyond every time to achieve goals, no matter how we feel, Ms. Read said.

High performance corporate cultures are a set of strict behaviors encouraged by job leaders or managers to help employees work as efficiently and effectively as possible over a short period of time – usually for pay.

This can range from satisfying all customers in a retail environment to meeting deadlines early or on time in an office environment.

“A high performance culture may initially seem exciting, but over time being rewarded for stretching at every turn can become competitive and exhausting,” she said.

This can ultimately lead to trading a short-term adrenaline rush for high levels of long-term anxiety and stress.

When we work in a high performance culture, we can expect to go above and beyond every time to achieve goals, no matter how we feel (stock image)

When we work in a high performance culture, we can expect to go above and beyond every time to achieve goals, no matter how we feel (stock image)

5. High workload

If you start to feel tired or stressed at work, it is likely that your workload is exceeding your capabilities.

For this reason, it’s important to stay in touch with how you’re feeling as you work and determine if it’s worth talking to your boss about.

“If you often feel like you need a break to ‘get away’, the overall load is likely to be too great,” Ms Read said.

“Feeling tired, stressed and feeling like there is little respite can lead to fatigue, resentment and lower productivity and job satisfaction. “


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