associate professor – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 10:11:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png associate professor – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 SIUE Adds Pioneering Synchronous Online Masters in Exercise and Sports Psychology http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/siue-adds-pioneering-synchronous-online-masters-in-exercise-and-sports-psychology/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/siue-adds-pioneering-synchronous-online-masters-in-exercise-and-sports-psychology/ The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior offers a fully online synchronous option for students seeking a master’s degree in kinesiology with a specialization in exercise and sports psychology. EDWARDSVILLE, Ill., March 15, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville The School of Education, Health and Human Behavior […]]]>

The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior offers a fully online synchronous option for students seeking a master’s degree in kinesiology with a specialization in exercise and sports psychology.

EDWARDSVILLE, Ill., March 15, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville The School of Education, Health and Human Behavior offers a fully online synchronous option for students seeking a master’s degree in kinesiology with a specialization in exercise and sports psychology. Beginning in fall 2022, this online synchronous program will be the first of its kind in the nation and will complement existing traditional and hybrid program options available through the Department of Applied Health.

“The online Synchronous Exercise and Sports Psychology program combines the convenience of online education with the benefits of a traditional classroom setting,” said Lindsay Ross Stewart, PhD, Associate Professor of Exercise and Sport Psychology. “Students will be able to interact with their classmates, learn directly, and develop relationships with their professors, while continuing to live and work in the location of their choice.”

The Sport and Exercise Psychology program integrates theory, research, and practice, and includes the study of cognitive, emotional, psychological, and social factors that influence sport and exercise behaviors, as well as the effects of physical activity on psychological factors. The program also has strong ties to SIUE’s Division I athletics program.

“Our students learn both exercise psychology and sports psychology, which is valuable for those who are still considering the educational and/or professional path they wish to pursue,” said Ben Webb, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Exercise and Sport Psychology. “Our program provides students with the coursework necessary to pass the Association for Applied Sport Psychology Certified Mental Performance Consultant certification exam.”

The Exercise and Sports Psychology program offers a number of distinct benefits, including:

  • Development of knowledge and skills in student areas of interest through strong faculty mentorship

  • An optimal student-teacher ratio, guaranteeing students personalized attention

  • Advice focused on professional success through the selection of courses, research topics and applied experiences

  • Compulsory courses that are offered in the evening to meet the needs of professionals

The program can be completed in 12 to 22 months, and students can begin in the fall, spring, or summer semesters.

For more information, visit siue.edu/academics/graduate/degrees-and-programs/kinesiology/exercise-sport-psychology.

The School of Education, Health, and Human Behavior prepares students in a wide range of fields, including public health, exercise science, nutrition, instructional technology, psychology, speech therapy, and audiology, educational administration, and teaching and learning. Faculty members engage in cutting-edge research, which enhances teaching and enriches the educational experience. The school supports the community through on-campus clinics, outreach to children and families, and a focused commitment to improving the lives of individuals throughout the region.

Media Contact

Megan Wieser, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville618-650-3653, mwieser@siue.edu

THE SOURCE Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville

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UC Santa Cruz implements a strategic plan for internationalization http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/uc-santa-cruz-implements-a-strategic-plan-for-internationalization/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:42:14 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/uc-santa-cruz-implements-a-strategic-plan-for-internationalization/ In support of a campus-wide effort to build and strengthen global relationships, UC Santa Cruz will adopt and implement a new internationalization strategic plan. The Strategic Plan for Internationalization (SPI) and corresponding implementation plan are living, evolving documents that are the result of campus participation in the American Council on Education’s (ACE) Internationalization Lab. UC […]]]>

In support of a campus-wide effort to build and strengthen global relationships, UC Santa Cruz will adopt and implement a new internationalization strategic plan.

The Strategic Plan for Internationalization (SPI) and corresponding implementation plan are living, evolving documents that are the result of campus participation in the American Council on Education’s (ACE) Internationalization Lab.

UC Santa Cruz advances comprehensive internationalization to ensure members of the campus community—students, faculty, and staff—are prepared and encouraged to study, teach, conduct research, and work in a global setting, and that institutional policies, programs, and initiatives are aligned to achieve this common goal.

“The important issues of our time do not stop at international borders,” said Chancellor Cynthia Larive. “Communities around the world are already deeply connected through social media, commerce and higher education. It is important that our community of students and scholars solve problems on a global scale, improve the well-being of people and places around the world and value the diversity of thought that an internationalization plan offers. solid.

Opportunities have already been launched under SPI during the pandemic to expand equity and access to global learning for UCSC students, as well as innovative virtual teaching opportunities for faculty.

Global Classrooms expands access

In fall 2021, four global classes were launched, which paired students from a UCSC class with students from classes in Kenya, Colombia, and China to work on joint projects virtually. Fall classes were taught by Merrill College Provost Elizabeth Abrams, lecturer Melvin Cox, associate professor of computer science and engineering Alvaro Cardenas, and assistant professor of linguistics Jess Law.

Three additional Global Classes are offered this winter term by Politics Professor Matthew Sparke, Right Livelihood College Coordinator David Shaw, Art Professor Beth Stevens and Continuing Anthropology Lecturer Annapurna Pandey. In the spring, classes will be taught by Associate Professor of Computational Media Angus Forbes and Professor of Digital Art and New Media Jennifer Parker.

Faculty teaching Global Classes have received training in Collaborative International Online Learning (COIL) to create successful models of class-to-class engagement in the virtual space. The call for applications is now open for the next round of Global Classrooms and faculty are encouraged to consider this opportunity to expand access to global learning through technology.

Virtual Student Exchange establishes links with Pacific Rim universities

Through its membership in the Association of Pacific Universities (APRU), UC Santa Cruz is part of a Virtual Student Exchange (VSE), which allows students to take online courses at top universities in the Pacific to earn UC credits as part of their full-time. registration. In exchange, students from these universities are allowed to enroll in online courses offered at UCSC.

Alan Christy’s history and memory course in the Okinawa Islands was described by a virtual exchange student from the University of Auckland as “incredibly satisfying and fulfilling. Not every course you leave feeling like you really have a knowledge of the subject matter that will stay with you wherever you go next. I believe this is largely attributable to the extensive and unrivaled knowledge of the instructor, as well as the large and high quality assessments and research material that the teaching staff have compiled.

The next opportunity for students to participate in VSE is Spring 2022. Students can learn more on the Global Learning website. Professors interested in offering their course online under this program in the fall of 2022 can look to the next call for course submissions in the spring.

Virtual Global Internships will continue in 2022

Virtual Global Internships were offered to students in the summer of 2021 as part of a pilot program and will continue through the summer of 2022. Interns were placed virtually in host organizations located in Canada, China, in Colombia, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Portugal, Singapore, Spain and Sweden. , and the United Kingdom. During their internship, the students also enrolled in summer courses offered by Languages ​​and Applied Linguistics and Cowell and Rachel Carson colleges. The extension to in-person placements abroad in summer 2022 will be launched specifically for psychology students in Spain and Portugal through a collaboration between the academic department and Global Engagement. These experiential learning opportunities, both virtual and in an international setting, help us achieve the Beyond the Classroom priority of our student success initiative.

In-person internships to bring international students to UCSC

The International Summer Research Internship (ISRP) launched virtually in the summer of 2021 through a collaboration with the Baskin School of Engineering and Global Engagement. This summer, Research Internships will be in-person, bringing top undergraduate students to UC Santa Cruz from overseas partner universities to work in research labs alongside students and faculty. Participants praised the practical benefits of learning to work in an international team and the value this research experience brings to their future academic and professional endeavours. Faculty have the opportunity to participate in this program as UC Santa Cruz expands ISRP into the summer of 2023 and beyond.

“Comprehensive internationalization requires the engagement and commitment of all levels of university management, faculty and staff on campus,” said Vice Provost Richard Hughey. “We urge anyone interested in this effort to visit our internationalization website. You’ll find details on the strategic plan, implementation timeline, progress on goals, and more.

“We hope that faculty, staff and students will participate in bringing a holistic perspective to our campus goals for teaching, research and service,” said Hughey. “We cannot solve global problems such as public health, climate change and global food shortages without international research and cooperation.”

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Face-to-face interaction enhances learning and innovation http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/face-to-face-interaction-enhances-learning-and-innovation/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 17:14:09 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/face-to-face-interaction-enhances-learning-and-innovation/ Whether virtual or in-person learning is better may be the wrong question. New psychology research from Cornell reveals that sitting face-to-face, rather than shoulder-to-shoulder, enhances learning and innovation, even when we’re learning complex physical skills that should be harder from that perspective . In experiments, children and adults solved a complex visual and spatial problem […]]]>

Whether virtual or in-person learning is better may be the wrong question.

New psychology research from Cornell reveals that sitting face-to-face, rather than shoulder-to-shoulder, enhances learning and innovation, even when we’re learning complex physical skills that should be harder from that perspective .

In experiments, children and adults solved a complex visual and spatial problem – opening a puzzle box – more quickly after watching a model demonstrate a solution face-to-face, compared to others who observed alongside or perpendicular to the model.

At all ages, test subjects performed best when they could observe not only an instructor’s hands, but also their eyes, gaze, and facial movements. The researchers propose that face-to-face interaction conveys valuable social information about goals and motivations in addition to visual information about the task.

“This shared mental perspective might be more important for certain types of learning than sharing a common visual perspective,” said Ashley Ransom, MA ’18, a doctoral candidate in the field of developmental psychology. “Face-to-face interaction could facilitate creativity and innovation rather than strict teacher mimicry.”

Ransom is the lead author with Dr. Brian LaGrant ’17, MD ’21, of “Face-to-Face Learning Improves the Social Transmission of Information,” published Feb. 25 in PLOS ONE. Adam K. Anderson, Professor in the Department of Psychology and College of Human Ecology (CHE), and Eve De Rosa, Associate Professor of Psychology and Rebecca Q. and James C. Morgan Sesquicentennial Fellow at CHE, and Dean of Faculty, are senior authors. Anthony Spiteri, a former postdoctoral fellow in Anderson and De Rosa’s Affect and Cognition lab, and Tamar Kushnir, now a professor at Duke University, are co-authors.

It is believed that learning a new visuospatial task, like how to tie a knot or play an instrument, requires us to adopt teachers’ perspectives, to try to see the world through their eyes. However, the new research suggests it could also be important to see their eyes.

Previous studies have shown that it is easier to imitate specific steps when learners see what an instructor sees – for example, watching a video of hands building a circuit board. When we move from this viewpoint at 0 degrees to an opposite angle at 180 degrees, our brain must use “mental rotation” to understand a model’s movements as meaning left or right, forward or backward.

As a result, according to the researchers, learning to open a puzzle box should be more difficult when observing someone face-to-face. But the study concluded otherwise.

“Remarkably, simply sitting across from someone can help overcome the limitations of shared visual perspective,” the authors wrote. “Face-to-face learning took precedence over the inherent difficulty of taking another’s visual point of view.”

The colorful puzzle box – also called an artificial fruit box when it was first developed for chimpanzee studies – contained four layers that required 12 steps to open, including the removal of bolts and panels, the moving the sliders and rotating the screws. There were several possible solutions and the model incorporated superfluous movements into their demonstration to help measure imitation.

The researchers randomly assigned 36 children aged 4 to 6 and 57 college students aged 18 to 27 to watch demonstrations of orientations at 0, 90 or 180 degrees to the model. Subjects were then given three tries to open the box in the position they preferred.

By one norm, face-to-face learners were less successful: they imitated less faithfully than participants who couldn’t see faces directly. But by achieving the real goal of opening the puzzle box, they were faster and more likely to come up with new solutions rather than relying on the pattern solution.

“They weren’t as good at imitating, but there’s a benefit to that because it made discovery easier,” Anderson said. “A social perspective – looking at people and where they are looking – has enabled children and adults to become better learners in what should have been the most difficult condition.”

Overall, adults were more likely to copy the model solution and choose to solve the puzzle box from the teacher’s perspective. The children, on the other hand, found new solutions and often remained in their original position.

These results suggest that adults have become better rote learners, but less innovative with time and more formal education.

“Adults focused on recreating the model’s actions rather than the end result,” the authors wrote. “Children are more flexible learners than adults and engage in more exploration while learning.”

The research was supported by a grant awarded to De Rosa from the Empire Innovation Program at the State University of New York.

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ADHD linked to hoarding behavior – new study http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/adhd-linked-to-hoarding-behavior-new-study/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 02:04:34 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/adhd-linked-to-hoarding-behavior-new-study/ New research has found that people with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are much more likely to display hoarding behaviors as well, which can have a serious impact on their quality of life. The study, published in the Psychiatric Research Journal and funded by the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust, found that nearly one in […]]]>

New research has found that people with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are much more likely to display hoarding behaviors as well, which can have a serious impact on their quality of life.

The study, published in the Psychiatric Research Journal and funded by the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust, found that nearly one in five people with ADHD had clinically significant levels of hoarding, indicating that there may be a hidden population of adults struggling with hoarding and its consequences.

Hoarding disorder is a recognized condition that involves excessive hoarding, difficulty throwing away, and excessive clutter. The disorder can cause distress or difficulty in daily life and can contribute to depression and anxiety.

Previous research on hoarding disorder has primarily focused on older women who identify as hoarders and seek help later in life. This new study, led by Dr Sharon Morein of Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), recruited 88 participants from an adult ADHD clinic run by the Cambridge and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust.

The study found that 19% of this ADHD group had clinically significant hoarding symptoms, were on average in their 30s, and there was an even gender split. Among the remaining 81%, the researchers found greater severity of hoarding, but not to a degree that significantly impairs their lives, compared to the control group in the study.

The researchers asked the same questions, about ADHD symptoms and impulsivity, levels of hoarding and clutter, obsessive-compulsive severity, perfectionism, depression and anxiety, and daily function, to a group closely matched population of 90 adults from the general population, without ADHD. diagnosis, and found that only 2% of this control group had clinically significant symptoms of hoarding.

They then replicated this with a wider online sample of 220 UK adults to see if similar patterns were found, and similarly only 3% of this group showed symptoms.

Dr Morein, Associate Professor of Psychology at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: “Hoarding disorder is much more than simply collecting too many possessions. People with diagnosed hoarding disorder have filled their living spaces with so many items and clutter that it impacts their daily functioning, leading to poorer quality of life, anxiety and depression.

“Overall, we found that people who were diagnosed with ADHD had a higher likelihood of also having symptoms of hoarding. This is important because it demonstrates that hoarding doesn’t just affect people more later in life, which are generally the focus of much of the research on hoarding disorder thus far.

“Our results also indicate that hoarding disorder should be routinely assessed in people with ADHD, as they typically do not disclose associated difficulties despite these potentially interfering with their daily lives. Similarly, it is possible that many people currently being treated for hoarding disorder also have undiagnosed ADHD.

“Greater awareness among clinicians and people with ADHD of the link between ADHD and hoarding may also lead to more effective long-term management, as hoarding often gets progressively worse over time.”


Warning: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases posted on EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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Marilyn Schroer Obituary (1956 – 2022) – Newberry, TX http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/marilyn-schroer-obituary-1956-2022-newberry-tx/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 17:35:31 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/marilyn-schroer-obituary-1956-2022-newberry-tx/ Dr. Marilyn Faye (Marek) Schroer February 1, 1956 – February 13, 2022 Dr. Marilyn Faye (Marek) Schroer, 66, of Newberry, South Carolina left this life and joined the Heaven’s Angels on Sunday February 13, 2022. Marilyn was born February 1, 1956 in Garland, Texas at Garland Clinic and Hospital to Joe and Faye Marek. She […]]]>
Dr. Marilyn Faye (Marek) Schroer

February 1, 1956 – February 13, 2022

Dr. Marilyn Faye (Marek) Schroer, 66, of Newberry, South Carolina left this life and joined the Heaven’s Angels on Sunday February 13, 2022. Marilyn was born February 1, 1956 in Garland, Texas at Garland Clinic and Hospital to Joe and Faye Marek. She was the eldest of four daughters. Marilyn and her sisters were known as “4 M” because their names were Marilyn, Melanie, Melinda and Melissa. At the age of eight, Marilyn was baptized and confirmed a member of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which is now known as the Fellowship of the Church of Christ. She sang in the Cantanina girls’ choir in her early church years. From adolescence to adulthood, Marilyn also sang in the adult choir and frequently played the piano and the flute. Often, she sang with her sisters growing up. After getting married and having children, she continued this singing tradition with her husband and two sons. The Schroers’ birthday calls were extra special, as she and her family sang a beautiful rendition of Happy Birthday.

Marilyn attended South Garland High School and graduated eighth in her class in 1974. At South Garland High School, Marilyn was a member of the National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, South Garland Chapter of the Future Homemakers of America (Treasurer) , as well as , the Colonel’s Band/Orchestra. Marilyn attended Graceland College in Lamoni, IA. She enjoyed participating in the Chapel Choir, Band, Orchestra and Service Corps. After leaving Graceland, she remembered that it was a wonderful start for the rest of her life. She said it gave her a strong religious background and she enjoyed meeting friends from all over the world. Some of his treasured memories at Graceland were snowball fights, singing in the choir, playing spades in the Swarm-Inn, January Winter Terms, “studying” at the library, and making lifelong friends. This experience gave him a desire to give back some of the blessings given to him. She graduated Magna Cum Laude in 1978 with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a minor in music. Marilyn continued her studies at Texas A&M University to obtain her master’s degree in educational psychology, with a specialization in gifted and talented children (1981), as well as her doctorate. in Educational Psychology with concentrations in Gifted and Talented Children and in School Psychology (1985). Dr. Schroer’s doctoral internship was at the Scottish Rite Hospital in Dallas, working with gifted children who have been diagnosed with learning and attention disabilities. Over time, Marilyn has published a number of articles in the field of education.

In high school, Marilyn gave private lessons to various students. During the summers between semesters at Graceland College, she worked full-time at the Chilton Credit Bureau in Dallas and concurrently as a waitress at Waffle House. After completing her classes a semester before graduation from Graceland, Marilyn began her career as a second-grade teacher in January 1978 at the Rosebud-Lott School District in central Texas, near the where his parents grew up. After Rosebud-Lott, she taught music for a year at Pearl C. Anderson Middle School in Dallas, Texas. She then taught at the University of Texas at Arlington for four years.

On June 17, 1989, Marilyn married Nathan A. Schroer in Richardson, Texas. Shortly after the birth of their first son, Joseph, they moved to Newberry, SC. A few years later, they welcomed their second son, David. When the boys were young, Marilyn worked as a skills development coordinator under a cross appointment at Piedmont Technical College and the Louis Rich Company. In August 1999, Marilyn joined the faculty of Newberry College in South Carolina and taught there until December 2019. Upon re-entry in December 2019, Dr. Marilyn Schroer, Associate Professor of Psychology, received the honor of outgoing professor with emeritus status.

Marilyn was preceded in Heaven by her parents, Joe and Faye Marek; and her stepmother, Dorothea Schroer. She will be remembered by Nathan, her husband of 32 years; as well as his sons and their wives, Joseph and Kasey Schroer of Chapin, SC; David Schroer of Newberry, South Carolina; Jonathan and Yulia Schroer from Munich, Germany; and Matthew and Mary Talmage Schroer of Lafayette, Colorado. She leaves behind two grandchildren. Marilyn will be sadly missed by her sisters and their husbands, Melanie Olmstead of Independence, MO; Melinda and Ernest Janecka of Terrell, TX; and Melissa and Gary Hutchison of Garland, TX; his nieces and nephews, Russell Smith and his wife Kristen; Tiffany Rondomanski and her husband Christopher; Stephanie Olmstead and her partner Christopher Lackey; Joshua Janecka; Brittany Gordon and her husband Scott; Jordan Hutchison; and Jason Hutchison and his wife Marley; his loving aunts are, Raye Beinhauer (twin sister of his mother) of Temple, TX; Eva Malone of Lucas, Texas; Flora Ann Kenworthy of Lee’s Summit, MO; Raye McIntosh of Pearland, TX, and Ann Marek of Temple, TX. She is loved by her adorable cousins ​​and many other relatives and friends. His lifelong friends are Dorothy Schulze Pool from O’Banion Junior High and South Garland and Elizabeth Raney Couper from Graceland College.

Marilyn was a faithful servant of her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ every day of her life. She touched the souls of many people. His teaching has blessed young children to college students over the years. She is much loved, and her sweet smile and Texas “Hi, y’all!” will be greatly missed. Marilyn’s many friends and family are impatiently awaiting this glorious day when all will be reunited in paradise once again.

The funeral service will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, February 25 at Powers Chapel Cemetery, 546 Hwy 2027, Rosebud, Texas.

The family suggests that memorials be made at Newberry College, 2100 College Street, Newberry SC 29108.

Memories and condolences can be shared at https://www.cook-gerngross-green-pattersonfuneralhome.com/ and whitakerfuneralhome.com.

Published by The Bryan-College Station Eagle on February 23, 2022.

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Study finds women aren’t posting less during pandemic http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/study-finds-women-arent-posting-less-during-pandemic/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 08:08:41 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/study-finds-women-arent-posting-less-during-pandemic/ A new study on COVID-19-era publishing patterns by gender contradicts previous research on the topic, suggesting that women have not published less than before the pandemic, overall. What the study calls gender inequality, however, has increased in some fields during this period of increased demands for care and quarantine, particularly in psychology, mathematics and philosophy. […]]]>

A new study on COVID-19-era publishing patterns by gender contradicts previous research on the topic, suggesting that women have not published less than before the pandemic, overall.

What the study calls gender inequality, however, has increased in some fields during this period of increased demands for care and quarantine, particularly in psychology, mathematics and philosophy.

“Our results do not offer the full picture,” says the study, published in the Journal of Information Science. Still, the results “clearly indicate that the COVID-19 bias in gender publication patterns is unclear.[;] the picture is complicated and calls for further study.

Seeking to verify further evidence that the productivity of women in research has been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, researchers involved in the new study reviewed 266,409 articles published in 2019, 2020 and January 2021 in 2,813 journals, across 21 disciplines, assuming all authors’ genders by their first names. All items were from the Springer-Nature database.

The idea was to compare posting rates by gender in each of those three years, looking for major discrepancies between 2019, fully before the pandemic, and after. Unlike many other studies with different methodologies and different datasets showing that women have lagged behind men in terms of publication since early 2020, this study found no significant difference between the three years.

It is above everything. There were, however, significant differences in some disciplines. The largest decrease in the proportion of female authors was recorded in psychology (-74.4% between 2019 and January 2021 and 12.3% between 2020 and January 2021). The second largest drop was recorded in mathematics (down 12.9% and 17.5%, respectively), followed by philosophy (down 11.3% and 10.3%, respectively).

The authors say it is “interesting” that philosophy and mathematics are so apparently affected by COVID-19, “because these disciplines generally do not require experimental studies with human subjects, and as such should be less likely to be affected by the pandemic.” Again, a great deal of anecdotal evidence suggests that research delays related to COVID-19 are not only external obstacles, but also that there is no time left after teaching, service and caregiving (the if applicable) to write.

The largest increase in the female-to-male author ratio in 2021, meanwhile, was in geography (42.6% increase from 2019 and 32% increase from 2020), followed by dentistry (27 .7% and 19.8%, respectively) and energy (25% and 7%, respectively).

“The results for dentistry are particularly interesting given that medicine, in general, is a discipline with a faster time to publication,” compared to other fields, the study says.

In mathematics and psychology, the new study also identified a drop in the number of articles with women as first authors during COVID-19, as well as in the number of male articles with women as co-authors.

“These declines may suggest that in these areas a culture of gender bias is more prevalent than in others,” the study said.

Another significant observation: in disciplines where the proportion of female authors is higher, there are fewer single-author articles.

The gender of the first author appears to affect the female-to-male ratio among co-authors, the study also found. In multi-author papers with women as first authors, there was generally more gender balance among authors: the average year-to-field ratio was 0.68 when a woman was the first author and 0.40 when the first perpetrator was a man.

Co-author Dariusz Jemielniak, professor of organization and management studies at Kozminski University in Poland and associate professor at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, said that “there is a lot of misunderstandings about gender bias in academia”. And while he’s “convinced” the bias exists, Jemielniak said “relying on a stereotype of how it works is counterproductive.” We need to make policy data-driven, and it’s important to essentially observe that data rather than assuming that a perception is enough.

Jemielniak said a practical policy implication “could be to be very careful about changes to the tenure review process. My gut feeling – not based on research – is that there was probably a bias important, but it was granular. For example, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if it turned out that while university women weren’t as affected, mothers of young children were, very disproportionately , even compared to fathers of young children.

Changes in the ratio of female to male authors, the number of female to male first authors, and the number of female to male authors when the first author is male.

Limits and caveats

Jemielniak also noted that this data must continue to be collected, as results may be delayed, given the relatively slow nature of academic publication. The researchers assumed average turnaround times of about three to six months from paper submission to publication, which is clearly within the scope of the study period. But Jemielniak said it is “quite possible that the actual publication results of the lockdowns will be delayed and observable until 2023”. Additionally, he said, the study cannot account for articles that have been repeatedly rejected, delaying their eventual publication dates.

Kathleen Dolan, eminent professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and co-editor of the American Journal of Political Sciencefound very early in the pandemic – part of a much broader examination of gender patterns in AJP– that women were actually posting a bit more than usual, but were posting fewer solo-written articles.

Dolan said this week that she doesn’t necessarily support the anecdotal idea that women have been affected more than men during COVID-19, but that this new study doesn’t “address the issue in the right way.” .

Looking at journal articles in 2019, 2020, and January 2021 isn’t “enough to see any real COVID-related pattern,” she said. “In many disciplines, a paper that is submitted to Time X and ultimately accepted for publication may not go to print for two years.” In political science, for example, she continued, a full year between submission and publication would be considered “fast.”

If COVID-19 has truly harmed female scholars more in terms of lost research time, “we shouldn’t expect to see this impact until journals published in 2022 at the earliest, but more likely in 2023 and 2024.”

With that in mind, Dolan said Jemielniak’s paper “would be a great baseline” for later comparisons.

For this reason, several other studies of the gendered effects of COVID-19 among academics have examined submissions to preprint repositories, where academics share articles long before they are officially published. Cassidy Sugimoto, Tom and Marie Patton School Chair at the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, co-authored such a pre-print study in May 2020 and said of Jemielniak’s article, “I would also cautious about these data representing the true extent of the data. We are still in a pandemic, and the long delays in publication distort the reality of what is happening in the lab right now.

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Just five more minutes, mom http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/just-five-more-minutes-mom/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 20:04:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/just-five-more-minutes-mom/ Lisa L Lewis THE WASHINGTON POST – We already know this pandemic has been horrific for teens and their mental health. Last month’s mental health advisory from the Surgeon General of the United States (USA) underscored the scale of the problem, as feelings of hopelessness and even suicidality have increased in recent years in this […]]]>

Lisa L Lewis

THE WASHINGTON POST – We already know this pandemic has been horrific for teens and their mental health.

Last month’s mental health advisory from the Surgeon General of the United States (USA) underscored the scale of the problem, as feelings of hopelessness and even suicidality have increased in recent years in this group of age, with the pandemic only adding to teenagers. ‘ stress levels.

But there’s another element that plays an important role in teen mental health, especially now: sleep and the role it plays in improving mental health and emotional resilience. As children and teens readapt to the world in the wake of pandemic isolation, sleeping well can be a protective factor, said Lisa Meltzer, a pediatric psychologist at National Jewish Health in Denver.

“When you’re not sleeping well, emotional regulation is one of the first things to do,” she said.

“Insufficient, poor quality or poorly timed sleep – each of these factors can worsen mental health problems.”

According to many sources, including the National Sleep Foundation and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, teens should get between eight and ten hours of sleep per night. But less than a quarter of high school students are meeting even the minimum, according to results from the most recent National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, conducted every two years by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

From a mental health perspective, aiming for more than the eight-hour minimum can be very helpful, experts say. In one study, teens who slept 8 3/4 to nine hours a night had the lowest levels of mental health problems, including mood swings, feelings of worthlessness, anxiety and depression.

In a recently published study examining college students’ sleep and mood, Tim Bono, associate professor of psychological and brain sciences at Washington University in St. week also had the highest increases in happiness and well-being throughout the semester.

This was true even for students who had lower baseline happiness levels at the start of the study.

Students with the most irregular sleep schedules were unhappy nearly twice as often, according to the study. Key sleep best practices, including consistency, appear to “significantly (affect) the trajectory of students’ psychological health,” Bono said.

When teens don’t get enough sleep during the week, they often sleep late on weekends to make up for the lack, perpetuating the cycle.

Getting enough sleep can provide an emotional buffer to help teens deal with everyday stressors, research shows.

Tiffany Yip, chair of the department of psychology at Fordham University, has studied how sleep affects adolescents’ ability to cope with discrimination-related stress.

A study she co-authored found that a good night’s sleep helped teens cope with discrimination and discrimination-related stress the next day.

Specifically, adolescents who had slept well the previous night were better able to select effective coping strategies, such as asking for help and not ruminating or obsessing over what had happened, he said. she declared. “When teenagers sleep well,” she said, “they are better able to cope with the stresses that await them tomorrow.”

And what about teenage sleep after a stressful day? It provides an emotional reset, helping them bounce back so there’s less fallout the next morning.

The researchers documented this “rebound” effect, finding that when teens slept more, they had a more positive overall mood the next morning, much like their mood after a low-stress day.

A “dose-dependent” association also exists between the amount of sleep adolescents have and their mood and self-harming behaviors. An analysis of youth risk behavior survey results found that high school students who reported sleeping less on school nights were proportionally more likely to report feeling sad or hopeless.

Compared to teens who slept for at least eight hours, those who slept for six hours or less were more than three times more likely to have considered suicide, made a plan, or attempted to , according to the analysis.

Meltzer characterizes the relationship between sleep and mental health as “intertwined”: sleep loss can negatively affect mood and emotional resilience, and mental health issues can affect sleep.

“We know that for different mental health diagnoses, anxiety and depression in particular, sleep can be both a symptom and a negative outcome of the disorder,” she said. “If we can improve sleep, some of the mental health symptoms will improve. But simply treating the sleep problem won’t necessarily cure depression or anxiety.

Instead, she recommended that both sides of the equation — sleep issues and mental health issues — be addressed simultaneously. (She also notes that teens sleeping too regularly — more than 10 hours a night — can be a sign of depression).

Meltzer emphasized the importance of sleep regularity for teens, as well as good sleep habits and best practices upon waking.

“Being exposed to bright light and getting out of bed in the morning is really essential,” she said. “For circadian rhythm regulation, it’s really important to have darkness in the evening and bright light in the morning.”

She also recommended teens not linger in bed, especially if they spend that time ruminating or using electronic devices.

“When we talk about sleep and mental health, those are the three takeaways: one, a consistent schedule; two, bright light in the morning; and three, only being in bed when sleeping,” Meltzer said.

Here are some other suggestions for promoting better sleep in teens:
– Moderate caffeine consumption: Caffeine is consumed by about 80% of teenagers and is a quick and effective stimulant, but caffeine in the afternoon or evening can make it more difficult to fall asleep that night. (As neuroscientist Matthew Walker notes in Why We Sleep, caffeine has a half-life of about five to seven hours, which means that even at bedtime half the caffeine will still be in your body. system).

– Be strategic when it comes to napping: Teenagers who nap too late in the day and/or too long can end up in a bad cycle.

– Exercise: Moderate to vigorous physical activity, such as walking, running, or playing basketball, can help set the stage for better sleep that night.

Again, timing is important: Late-night exercises can make teens feel more alert. (If evening practices and the like cannot be avoided, being intentional about winding down before bed can help counteract this).

Bono described sleep as an “investment”. As he told students, “Yes, it takes away the number of waking hours you have, but it ensures that during the hours you’re awake, you’re at your peak performance for happiness, for connect with other people and for well-being.”

Although it’s not a panacea, he says, “it’s a simple thing that can go a long way.”

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Concerned about in-person classes? Here’s how you can build resilience http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/concerned-about-in-person-classes-heres-how-you-can-build-resilience/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 05:46:23 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/concerned-about-in-person-classes-heres-how-you-can-build-resilience/ With a full return to in-person classes on February 7, 2022, students at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) should be feeling anxious. While some worry about their safety on campus due to Covid-19, others are nervous about the upcoming closed-book midterm season. As such, building resilience is key to preventing mental and physical distress. […]]]>

With a full return to in-person classes on February 7, 2022, students at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) should be feeling anxious. While some worry about their safety on campus due to Covid-19, others are nervous about the upcoming closed-book midterm season. As such, building resilience is key to preventing mental and physical distress.

Dr. Judith P. Andersen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at UTM. As a health psychologist, her research focuses on the biological, psychological and social factors that cause physical and mental stress and impact our health and performance. Last week, in conjunction with the Health and Counseling Center, she facilitated a Wellness 101 workshop on building resilience. Dr. Andersen explores important coping mechanisms that students can use to help manage stressful situations.

At the start of the winter semester, she organized an online survey for her PSY340H5: Abnormal Psychology to classify. In it, she found that most of her students suffered from burnout. “It seems to indicate that, right away, at the start of the semester, we are already potentially tapping into our long-term reserves. [as opposed to relying on short-term reserves],” she says.

According to Dr. Andersen, humans have both short-term and long-term physical reserves. These reserves determine our physical and emotional state. Lack of energy and stress are examples of a short-term reserve – this reflects an imbalance in our nervous system. When left untreated, it can lead to symptoms of burnout, draining the long-term reserve.

Stress has been linked to mental health disorders, including depression and suicide, as well as increased risks of heart attack and early death. Dr. Andersen explains that our stress response begins in the brain. Our brainstem controls important bodily functions such as our heart rate and breathing rate. The brain then uses this information and stimulates a stress response. For example, when we feel uncomfortable or scared, our brain releases stress-inducing hormones like cortisol into our bloodstream as a “fight or flight” response.

Currently, Dr. Andersen is working with first responders to develop evidence-based resilience training programs. In her research, she discovered that stress contributes to errors and lethal force errors. For example, during high-stress situations that police officers face, vision difficulties can occur and their thinking processes are impaired, leading to fatal errors such as lethal force. Using resilience training, Dr. Andersen discovered that police officers were less likely to make such mistakes. Additionally, she found that police officers who were constantly exposed to stress and trauma were more likely to develop diabetes and cancer. Thus, his research also focuses on “improving performance and resilience through training”.

For students, building resilience can help strengthen our mental and physical health. To do this, we must work to rebuild our short-term and long-term reserves. According to Dr. Andersen, a good night’s sleep, meditation, or any relaxing activity can replenish short-term stores. However, she points out that sometimes these solutions do not work. You may wake up feeling tired for a few days instead of feeling refreshed.

“Students who don’t receive help now or at the end of the semester may have difficulty meeting deadlines. This is why it is crucial to pay attention to our [physical] health and sanity, even when we feel good,” she adds.

Dr. Andersen presents the “reset, refocus, react” method for coping with stress. Often, in stressful situations, just giving yourself pep talks in your head isn’t enough to calm you down. She notes that the body’s natural response to stress is to refocus all our energy on this perceived threat. As a result, positive affirmations are overshadowed. Instead, she advises us to focus our attention on what she calls “manual override,” like taking control of our breathing.

During resilience training with first responders, Dr. Andersen found that their heart rates increased before arriving on the scene due to the uncertainty of how events would unfold. After performing a one-breath breathing technique, the first responders’ heart rate lowered to the optimal level. Dr. Andersen developed the International Resilience and Performance Effectiveness Program (iPREP) to “train first responders in techniques that would improve their mental and physical readiness in high-stress situations.” iPREP was implemented by Peel Police in 2016 in hopes of improving well-being and reducing errors such as fatal errors.

“It’s about finding a balance,” Dr. Andersen concludes. “You physically need to replenish your reserves and protect your long-term reserves because they’re depleted.”

To avoid burnout, she suggests setting limits. It might look like not responding to emails after a certain amount of time, blocking off a day off each week, or taking the weekend off. By setting limits, we are able to keep time for ourselves and replenish our reserves. In doing so, we avoid tapping into long-term reserves, thereby avoiding burnout and remaining resilient.


Associated Feature Editor (Volume 48) —
Maneka is a second-year student pursuing a double major in philosophy and political science. For Maneka, whether during an interview or during informal meetings, the question “tell me a little more about yourself” is the worst. It always freaks her out because she really doesn’t know what to say or what they want to know. She prefers to know more about them. When she’s not studying, writing, or napping, Maneka is likely binge-watching, or rather re-watching TV shows, singing, or listening to music.

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Empowering College students to be creators and curators of OER http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/empowering-college-students-to-be-creators-and-curators-of-oer/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 05:36:03 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/empowering-college-students-to-be-creators-and-curators-of-oer/ Imagine the possibilities if students learned not only to use open educational resources (OER), but also to organize and design OER in their college courses. This action of moving college students from consumers to creators of OER can have positive impacts on their learning and can break down classroom walls by making the knowledge students […]]]>

Imagine the possibilities if students learned not only to use open educational resources (OER), but also to organize and design OER in their college courses. This action of moving college students from consumers to creators of OER can have positive impacts on their learning and can break down classroom walls by making the knowledge students build accessible to the public online (Trust & Maloy, 2022).

As university educators, we have been engaged in this type of open educational practice (Beetham et al., 2012) for several years. In our courses, we asked undergraduate and graduate students to add tool review pages to the Online Tools for Teaching and Learning OER website, make changes and additions to resourcesforhistoryteachers OER Wiki, design OER online courses to support educator learning (e.g. Designing Digital Media for Teaching and Learning; PLN for Educators), produce videos with OER material for interactive map campus resources and write multi-modal chapters for the OER e-book Teaching with digital tools and apps.

Analysis of post-course surveys from six of our courses in which students engaged in these projects revealed that student motivation and attitudes toward course content improved when they participated in these design projects. of REL. Additionally, students were able to develop several 21st century skills (e.g., communication, teamwork, technical literacy, creative thinking, planning) and gain knowledge that supported their ability to achieve goals. course learning.

Based on our findings, we believe that university students and educators can benefit from the curation and design of OER. As such, we offer the following tips for college instructors to incorporate OER design projects into their courses:

First, use an instructional design model, such as the ADDIE Instructional Design Model (see Trust & Pektas, 2018) or the Design Thinking Model, to strategically guide the design process. Both of these models encourage OER designers to begin by identifying and understanding a problem or need rather than jumping straight into building something. You can start by asking students to identify a specific problem or need related to your course content. For example, students in a teacher training course might identify the need for OER on how to effectively use technology in emergency distance learning or on how to enrich learning activities. writing with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math). In a science lesson, students might identify the need to improve how the media portrays traditionally marginalized groups of individuals in videos, news, or science textbooks. Then, during the design phase, encourage students to build a prototype of their OER on paper and pencil, post-it notes, or in a digital document rather than the digital medium where it will be produced (e.g., Google Sites, Canva, wiki). This makes it easier for students to make quick changes to their OER as they engage in usability and accessibility testing to ensure that their OER will be accessible to everyone. Then implement or share OER on social media and collect feedback to gauge its success.

Second, provide students with learning opportunities and resources to expand their knowledge of open licensing, copyright and fair use (see Selecting digital media for your website), design techniques (explore the Web Design Basics for Educators e-book) and places to find openly. licensed material (e.g. A Guide to Finding Media for Classroom Projects). There is “a growing need to build knowledge around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a core competency” (Paskevicius & Irvine, 2019, p. 8 ) and OER Design Projects are one such way to meet this need. You can start by encouraging students to remix OER created by others. They can start by searching the OER Commons or Mason OER Metafinder database for OER materials. Then they can analyze the license of the materials they find to determine if and how they can remix and use the materials in their OER design project. They can also decide which type of open license to select for their OER design project (see Choosing a Creative Commons License).

Third, to help students develop their information and media skills, particularly in the areas of locating reliable online information and identifying diverse perspectives and media to include in OER materials. Given the amount of disinformation, misinformation, and misinformation (Shrader, 2021) online, students must learn to critically assess and identify information that they can use to design the text and multimodal content of their REL brackets. The bill please! Start-up course and Critical Media Education and Civic Learning eBook offers several resources and activities to help students develop their information literacy and critical media literacy skills. Students should also learn to design OER that includes diverse perspectives and voices. One of the many benefits of OER is that it opens up access to learning for people around the world. However, when OERs are primarily written by white, English-speaking, American or European academics, and feature their voices, this limits the “open” aspect of OERs. Before starting an OER design project, have students explore Open to margins, an open access e-book edited by Bali, Cronin, Czerniewicz, DeRosa, and Jhangiani (2020), then consider how they can make their OER media more inclusive.

Fourth, provide students with the opportunity to learn to work together during their OER projects to develop their skills in teamwork, collaboration, and communication. Many students who worked on our OER design projects identified several benefits to collaborating with their classmates, however, several students also mentioned that the challenges of working in teams had a negative impact on their motivation and their attitudes towards learning and towards OER design projects. Before assigning group work, it can be helpful to start by discussing ways in which teams can be effective, productive, and supportive. For example, you can encourage students to break down the assignment into smaller tasks, determine the roles or tasks of each member of the group, and set up a communication strategy for group work. With some support, the gains of collaboration can outweigh the challenges of working with others.

Ultimately, the creation and curation of OER provides a way to expand the scope and depth of student learning across disciplines and areas of work. The creation and curation of OER prepares students to be active producers of knowledge rather than passive receivers of knowledge. It guides them to be ahead of the curve – to become change innovators who think outside the confines of traditional practices. It allows them to broaden their skills and become creative designers of knowledge and producers of materials that open access to learning. Given our highly technological and interconnected world, the creation and curation of OER is an essential experience in a true 21st century college education.


Torrey Trust, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Learning Technology in the Department of Teacher Education and Curriculum Studies, College of Education, University of Massachusetts Amherst. His scholarship and teaching focus on how technology shapes the learning of educators and students. In 2018, Dr. Trust was selected as one of five global recipients of the ISTE Making IT Happen Award, which “honors outstanding educators and leaders who demonstrate commitment, leadership, courage and extraordinary perseverance in improving digital learning opportunities for students”. www.torreytrust.com

Robert Maloy, EdD, is a lecturer in the College of Education at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he coordinates the history teacher training program and co-directs the TEAMS Tutoring Project, a community engagement initiative / service learning through which university students tutor culturally and linguistically diverse students at public schools in the Connecticut River Valley area of ​​western Massachusetts. He is co-author of two recent open books, Building Democracy for All: Interactive Explorations of Government and Civic Life and Critical Media Literacy and Civic Learning.

The references

Beetham, H., Falconer, I., McGill, L. & Littlejohn, A. (2012). Open Practices: Backgrounder. JISC. https://oersynth.pbworks.com/w/page/51668352/OpenPracticesBriefing

Paskevicius, M., & Irvine, V. (2019b). Designing open education and learning: open pedagogy in practice. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 2019(1-10). https://doi.org/10.5334/jime.512

Schrader, J. (2021). The Intent Behind a Lie: Error, Misinformation, and Misinformation. psychology today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/misinformation-desk/202112/the-intent-behind-lie-mis-dis-and-malinformation

Trust, T. & Pektas, E. (2018). Using the ADDIE Model and Universal Design for Learning Principles to develop an open online course for teacher professional development. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 34(4), 219-233.

Trust, T. & Maloy, R. (2022). Engagement of college students in OER design projects: impacts on attitudes, motivation and learning. Manuscript submitted for publication.


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THE FIDGET FACTOR – The Gisborne Herald http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-fidget-factor-the-gisborne-herald/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 00:14:34 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-fidget-factor-the-gisborne-herald/ After careers as an accountant and tax lawyer, and currently pursuing a doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Auckland, Gisborne-born Gina Waters returns home after 20 years. She is part of a groundbreaking Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) research team at the Mātai Medical Research Institute. Gina talks to Avneesh Vincent about her […]]]>

After careers as an accountant and tax lawyer, and currently pursuing a doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Auckland, Gisborne-born Gina Waters returns home after 20 years. She is part of a groundbreaking Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) research team at the Mātai Medical Research Institute. Gina talks to Avneesh Vincent about her role in the study, her career development, and the need for advanced medical technology.

Gina’s return trip to Tairāwhiti included trips to Europe and Western Australia while pursuing university studies. Now back home, she works with Mātai researchers who conduct pre-digital assessments, which involve consent documents, and perform a continuous performance task (CPT) with volunteers.

The research team conducted its final empty run on Wednesday with team members volunteering to scan their brain activity – to assess attention and decision-making (a Flankers test) – under the Mātai’s state-of-the-art functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). machine.

“This method of scanning images of blood flow in the brain, which makes it different from a standard MRI, and it is safe,” Gina said.

The scanning procedure takes one hour and 20 minutes, including a break, and participants must be under the scanner most of the time.

“We recognize the time participants spend on the test. That’s why our Mātai staff here did the test themselves to make sure it’s comfortable enough.

A projection of an LCD (liquid crystal display) screen behind the participants displays instructions on what the researchers are doing, but most scans involve people receiving a ‘relaxing treatment’ – landscape images paired with music soothing in the scanner.

This is a collaborative study between researchers from the Auckland Bioengineering Institute (ABI) and the Mātai Medical Research Institute in Gisborne. ABI Associate Professor Justin Fernandez is the project leader.

Three years ago, he hypothesized that the increased blood flow to the frontal lobe and increased neurotransmitter activity caused by restlessness might help people with ADHD focus.

The research proposes using fMRI scans to determine whether restlessness, often seen in people with ADHD, might enhance activation in the decision-making region of the brain.

Gina said that from a psychological perspective, her role was to administer a continuous performance task (CPT) – a 15-minute assessment – to determine if there was consistency between the fMRI imaging and the tests. CPT.

“When it’s consistent, I should be able to just pull an image from the scanner and confirm whether or not it’s ADHD and give them a score.”

Gina’s interest in the healthcare industry was her third career move.

“I was an accountant, because I loved doing calculations and I was passionate about it. I went on to be a tax lawyer and then got to a point where I wanted to work with people instead of sitting in front of spreadsheets.

She turned around and studied for a social work degree in psychology, completing her masters in Australia.

After her studies, she worked as a mental health social worker with the Martu and Nyiyaparli people in the desert of Western Australia and the Jawoyn people of Katherine in the Northern Territory.

“I went there as a specialist in substance abuse and suicide prevention, caring for people who were sick and in need of psychiatric help,” she said.

On occasion, Gina had to travel to remote communities up to 1200 km away and during this time she developed an interest in clinical mental health.

To deepen her interest in the health sector, she decided to undertake her PhD, this time in Aotearoa.

“I wanted to go home, because I have my whānau here in New Zealand. My eldest son studies at the University of Auckland. . . so I chose the same university as him.

As she completed her preparatory year for a clinical doctorate last year, she attended an anatomy lecture that gave her insight into brain function and its impact on human behavior, and saw her first fMRI of the human brain.

“From that moment on, I was fascinated by the anatomical relationship between the brain and behavior. I found it exciting to see such an image and that there are people who dedicate their careers to such study, which is pretty cool.

After attending a series of lectures on anatomy, she was convinced to pursue her new interest.

She approached Mātai’s research director, Dr Samantha Holdsworth, who put her in touch with Dr Fernandez and the ADHD project at Gisborne.

A fundamental aspect of the research is its multidisciplinary approach, with the ABI research team bringing a background in biomedical engineering, supported by Gina’s psychological perspective and technical expertise from the medical center.

“The role of psychology is to address the learning difficulties of those on the ADHD spectrum who have significant symptoms,” she said.

The research study will begin testing in adults and then follow up with children.

“If research like this at Mātai and Justin’s group can take place in remote rural communities like the East Coast, then advanced health technologies become normalized and more accessible.

She took on the challenge of normalizing the use of technology to reduce health inequities in the community.

“What excites me about research is the preventative potential of this technology and all the good that can be done if health problems are caught early.”

Gina plans to do her internship at Gisborne for the final year of her clinical doctorate.

“I have my whānau here in Gisborne – two nieces and a nephew, great-nephews and a great-niece, my aunts and uncle and my cousins. My whānau have maintained ahi kaa (kept the fire) for me all these years, so it feels good to come home.

COMPENSATORY STRATEGY: Gina Waters says restlessness is a good strategy to develop if you have ADHD. “My understanding is that the earlier you develop it, the better.” Photo by Liam Clayton

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