public health – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 10:11:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png public health – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 SIUE Adds Pioneering Synchronous Online Masters in Exercise and Sports Psychology http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/siue-adds-pioneering-synchronous-online-masters-in-exercise-and-sports-psychology/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/siue-adds-pioneering-synchronous-online-masters-in-exercise-and-sports-psychology/ The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior offers a fully online synchronous option for students seeking a master’s degree in kinesiology with a specialization in exercise and sports psychology. EDWARDSVILLE, Ill., March 15, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville The School of Education, Health and Human Behavior […]]]>

The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior offers a fully online synchronous option for students seeking a master’s degree in kinesiology with a specialization in exercise and sports psychology.

EDWARDSVILLE, Ill., March 15, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville The School of Education, Health and Human Behavior offers a fully online synchronous option for students seeking a master’s degree in kinesiology with a specialization in exercise and sports psychology. Beginning in fall 2022, this online synchronous program will be the first of its kind in the nation and will complement existing traditional and hybrid program options available through the Department of Applied Health.

“The online Synchronous Exercise and Sports Psychology program combines the convenience of online education with the benefits of a traditional classroom setting,” said Lindsay Ross Stewart, PhD, Associate Professor of Exercise and Sport Psychology. “Students will be able to interact with their classmates, learn directly, and develop relationships with their professors, while continuing to live and work in the location of their choice.”

The Sport and Exercise Psychology program integrates theory, research, and practice, and includes the study of cognitive, emotional, psychological, and social factors that influence sport and exercise behaviors, as well as the effects of physical activity on psychological factors. The program also has strong ties to SIUE’s Division I athletics program.

“Our students learn both exercise psychology and sports psychology, which is valuable for those who are still considering the educational and/or professional path they wish to pursue,” said Ben Webb, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Exercise and Sport Psychology. “Our program provides students with the coursework necessary to pass the Association for Applied Sport Psychology Certified Mental Performance Consultant certification exam.”

The Exercise and Sports Psychology program offers a number of distinct benefits, including:

  • Development of knowledge and skills in student areas of interest through strong faculty mentorship

  • An optimal student-teacher ratio, guaranteeing students personalized attention

  • Advice focused on professional success through the selection of courses, research topics and applied experiences

  • Compulsory courses that are offered in the evening to meet the needs of professionals

The program can be completed in 12 to 22 months, and students can begin in the fall, spring, or summer semesters.

For more information, visit siue.edu/academics/graduate/degrees-and-programs/kinesiology/exercise-sport-psychology.

The School of Education, Health, and Human Behavior prepares students in a wide range of fields, including public health, exercise science, nutrition, instructional technology, psychology, speech therapy, and audiology, educational administration, and teaching and learning. Faculty members engage in cutting-edge research, which enhances teaching and enriches the educational experience. The school supports the community through on-campus clinics, outreach to children and families, and a focused commitment to improving the lives of individuals throughout the region.

Media Contact

Megan Wieser, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville618-650-3653, mwieser@siue.edu

THE SOURCE Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville

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UC Santa Cruz implements a strategic plan for internationalization http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/uc-santa-cruz-implements-a-strategic-plan-for-internationalization/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:42:14 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/uc-santa-cruz-implements-a-strategic-plan-for-internationalization/ In support of a campus-wide effort to build and strengthen global relationships, UC Santa Cruz will adopt and implement a new internationalization strategic plan. The Strategic Plan for Internationalization (SPI) and corresponding implementation plan are living, evolving documents that are the result of campus participation in the American Council on Education’s (ACE) Internationalization Lab. UC […]]]>

In support of a campus-wide effort to build and strengthen global relationships, UC Santa Cruz will adopt and implement a new internationalization strategic plan.

The Strategic Plan for Internationalization (SPI) and corresponding implementation plan are living, evolving documents that are the result of campus participation in the American Council on Education’s (ACE) Internationalization Lab.

UC Santa Cruz advances comprehensive internationalization to ensure members of the campus community—students, faculty, and staff—are prepared and encouraged to study, teach, conduct research, and work in a global setting, and that institutional policies, programs, and initiatives are aligned to achieve this common goal.

“The important issues of our time do not stop at international borders,” said Chancellor Cynthia Larive. “Communities around the world are already deeply connected through social media, commerce and higher education. It is important that our community of students and scholars solve problems on a global scale, improve the well-being of people and places around the world and value the diversity of thought that an internationalization plan offers. solid.

Opportunities have already been launched under SPI during the pandemic to expand equity and access to global learning for UCSC students, as well as innovative virtual teaching opportunities for faculty.

Global Classrooms expands access

In fall 2021, four global classes were launched, which paired students from a UCSC class with students from classes in Kenya, Colombia, and China to work on joint projects virtually. Fall classes were taught by Merrill College Provost Elizabeth Abrams, lecturer Melvin Cox, associate professor of computer science and engineering Alvaro Cardenas, and assistant professor of linguistics Jess Law.

Three additional Global Classes are offered this winter term by Politics Professor Matthew Sparke, Right Livelihood College Coordinator David Shaw, Art Professor Beth Stevens and Continuing Anthropology Lecturer Annapurna Pandey. In the spring, classes will be taught by Associate Professor of Computational Media Angus Forbes and Professor of Digital Art and New Media Jennifer Parker.

Faculty teaching Global Classes have received training in Collaborative International Online Learning (COIL) to create successful models of class-to-class engagement in the virtual space. The call for applications is now open for the next round of Global Classrooms and faculty are encouraged to consider this opportunity to expand access to global learning through technology.

Virtual Student Exchange establishes links with Pacific Rim universities

Through its membership in the Association of Pacific Universities (APRU), UC Santa Cruz is part of a Virtual Student Exchange (VSE), which allows students to take online courses at top universities in the Pacific to earn UC credits as part of their full-time. registration. In exchange, students from these universities are allowed to enroll in online courses offered at UCSC.

Alan Christy’s history and memory course in the Okinawa Islands was described by a virtual exchange student from the University of Auckland as “incredibly satisfying and fulfilling. Not every course you leave feeling like you really have a knowledge of the subject matter that will stay with you wherever you go next. I believe this is largely attributable to the extensive and unrivaled knowledge of the instructor, as well as the large and high quality assessments and research material that the teaching staff have compiled.

The next opportunity for students to participate in VSE is Spring 2022. Students can learn more on the Global Learning website. Professors interested in offering their course online under this program in the fall of 2022 can look to the next call for course submissions in the spring.

Virtual Global Internships will continue in 2022

Virtual Global Internships were offered to students in the summer of 2021 as part of a pilot program and will continue through the summer of 2022. Interns were placed virtually in host organizations located in Canada, China, in Colombia, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Portugal, Singapore, Spain and Sweden. , and the United Kingdom. During their internship, the students also enrolled in summer courses offered by Languages ​​and Applied Linguistics and Cowell and Rachel Carson colleges. The extension to in-person placements abroad in summer 2022 will be launched specifically for psychology students in Spain and Portugal through a collaboration between the academic department and Global Engagement. These experiential learning opportunities, both virtual and in an international setting, help us achieve the Beyond the Classroom priority of our student success initiative.

In-person internships to bring international students to UCSC

The International Summer Research Internship (ISRP) launched virtually in the summer of 2021 through a collaboration with the Baskin School of Engineering and Global Engagement. This summer, Research Internships will be in-person, bringing top undergraduate students to UC Santa Cruz from overseas partner universities to work in research labs alongside students and faculty. Participants praised the practical benefits of learning to work in an international team and the value this research experience brings to their future academic and professional endeavours. Faculty have the opportunity to participate in this program as UC Santa Cruz expands ISRP into the summer of 2023 and beyond.

“Comprehensive internationalization requires the engagement and commitment of all levels of university management, faculty and staff on campus,” said Vice Provost Richard Hughey. “We urge anyone interested in this effort to visit our internationalization website. You’ll find details on the strategic plan, implementation timeline, progress on goals, and more.

“We hope that faculty, staff and students will participate in bringing a holistic perspective to our campus goals for teaching, research and service,” said Hughey. “We cannot solve global problems such as public health, climate change and global food shortages without international research and cooperation.”

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How ‘national narcissism’ makes people more likely to believe in conspiracy theories http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-national-narcissism-makes-people-more-likely-to-believe-in-conspiracy-theories/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 05:45:18 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-national-narcissism-makes-people-more-likely-to-believe-in-conspiracy-theories/ Believing that you are part of a nation that is superior to all and deserves special treatment, this is what “national narcissism” looks like. National narcissism is one of many forms of “collective narcissismwhere an individual or group of people takes an exaggerated, often defensive view of the group and seeks external validation for the […]]]>

Believing that you are part of a nation that is superior to all and deserves special treatment, this is what “national narcissism” looks like. National narcissism is one of many forms of “collective narcissismwhere an individual or group of people takes an exaggerated, often defensive view of the group and seeks external validation for the same.

This delusion of unprecedented magnitude makes people even more vulnerable to conspiracy theories, according to a new study. Unfortunately, when the conspiracy theories in question relate to a global health crisis, the resulting domino effect can reinforce misinformation and endanger the real lives of real people.

Posted in the Bulletin of Personality and Social Psychologythe present results are based on data collected directly from two large-scale national surveys conducted in the United States and the United Kingdom. The data includes 950 participants and a secondary analysis of data from 56 countries involving more than 50,000 participants.

The study analyzed people’s propensity to trust conspiracy theories in relation to the pandemic. The results consistently demonstrated two links. First, national narcissism was not only a more common trait among people who were more likely to believe conspiracy theories, but also to endorse misinformation based on them – for example, in the form of attackers WhatsApp. Second, as perhaps intuitive, belief in conspiracy theories also made people less likely to participate in precautionary behaviors and less supportive of public health policies.

“An exaggerated belief in national greatness…is associated with a greater focus on defending the country’s image than on caring for its citizens. It also correlates with seeing outgroups as a threat and blaming them for misfortunes within the group,” said one. study from 2020 Explain. “To increase people’s willingness to take a pandemic seriously and engage with other nations to defeat it, citizens and leaders may have to accept that their country is at risk, just like others, and find ways to share resources and expertise across national borders”.


Related to The Swaddle:

Covid19 misinformation spreads in 87 countries and costs lives: study


The researchers believe that the extremely consistent findings across cultures provide us with important insights into how people’s social identity can contribute to a nation’s collective health.

“People need to understand that social identity plays a central role in how people construct their beliefs… This can, of course, be a good thing if you’re part of a group that values ​​accuracy and the well-being of group members. Alternatively, it can be a bad thing if your identity involves exaggerated views of your group and an obsession with dominance or image management,” noted Jay Van Bavel from the Department of Psychology and Neural Sciences at New York University in the United States, who participated in the 2020 study as well as the current one.

However, it is important to remember that national narcissism goes beyond love or pride in one’s country, values ​​and traditions. There is also more than “political conservatism,” which is resistance to political change; or even beyond “national identification”, which means centering one’s identity around one’s country.

“National narcissists…pursue a political agenda that is primarily driven by concerns of what makes their nation to see good. They care about what the nation can do for them and how it reflects on them… [They] are quick to abandon their country if it benefits them,” the authors wrote.

For now, Van Bavel thinks “the most obvious future direction” is to understand how national narcissism can be “experimentally manipulated” – perhaps to ensure more desirable health outcomes.

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Online Roadmap Podcast: Online Student Registration | Online roadmap http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/online-roadmap-podcast-online-student-registration-online-roadmap/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 13:30:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/online-roadmap-podcast-online-student-registration-online-roadmap/ Tammy Bishoff talks with WVU Online Enrollment Management Coordinator Jennifer Pruzinsky about the online student enrollment process and how her department tailors the experience to each student. Transcription Hello everyone. Welcome to this week’s episode of the Online Roadmap Podcast, which is WVU Online’s own podcast series. This is Tammy, and today I’m joined by […]]]>

Tammy Bishoff talks with WVU Online Enrollment Management Coordinator Jennifer Pruzinsky about the online student enrollment process and how her department tailors the experience to each student.

Transcription

Hello everyone. Welcome to this week’s episode of the Online Roadmap Podcast, which is WVU Online’s own podcast series. This is Tammy, and today I’m joined by Jennifer Pruzinsky. Jennifer is the Registration Management Coordinator for WVU Online. Welcome to our show today. Thank you very much for having me.

It’s an honor to be here and to speak with all of you today. Awesome. We are super excited to have you, how do you feel, tell us a bit about your background and your role here at WTF? Absoutely. Yeah, so a lot of people seem to end up working in higher education and admissions. I always knew that was what I was supposed to do.

So I’m very grateful to have worked in higher education and admissions. Since 2007, I have completed my BS in Biology and Psychology from Waynesburg College. Now in college, just up from Morgantown. And then I pursued my Masters in Student Affairs and Higher Education at IUP.

As I mentioned, I have worked in college admissions since 2007 at several different colleges and universities, as well as the National Association for College Admissions Counseling in Arlington, Virginia. But working for West Virginia University has always been my dream. And so I’m really excited to now and forever be a mountaineer. In my role as the Enrollment Management Coordinator for WVU Online, I oversee the team of Online Admissions Coaches and the Learner Engagement Center. Their coaches are really there to help guide the prospect and current students. And our goal is really to make sure that all students have support throughout the application, registration processes, and are connected to appropriate campus resources pprocess and even once they are enrolled so that ultimately they will graduate from West Virginia University. And I’m particularly in my role, I can also work with a lot of different departments on campus, whether it’s academics, student affairs, or veterans affairs, and just make sure that all processes and communication run smoothly.

That’s wonderful. Engage with different units on campus to do this for our students online. I know it’s so important to make sure they feel included and have all those opportunities that other students have. So, do students like to choose their coach or are they assigned to them?

How it works? Yeah, that’s a, that’s a great question. Students are actually assigned an admissions coach based on the program they intend to enroll in. So, at the moment, there are three of us working directly with the students. We have programs at all levels, so we have undergraduate and graduate programs and certificates.

The coaches therefore work closely together. The academic program, coordinators and faculty. And so they are really knowledgeable about the different majors, requirements, and credits required for each of the programs they run. They therefore help students navigate the process. And so Kelly, she oversees, for example, Chambers College of Business and Economics, College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences Gary Overseas, students entering the College of Education, Davis College Human Services.

Culture, Natural Resources and Design, as well as the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources. And then I work with students who are currently in Eberly College and schools of nursing, social work, and public health. And then we have a few other partners on campus that work with students for undergraduate business and then legal studies and majors that also fall under Reed College of Media.

wow. It’s great that we actually have. Specialized knowledge and works directly with colleges rather than having a little knowledge of everything. So the next question I have for you might be a test, but it might not be. Is your favorite college team? Yeah, so definitely West Virginia Mountaineers.

It’s definitely been my team for as long as I can remember, even growing up and having lots of family in Southwestern Pennsylvania. After going to college in southwestern Pennsylvania in Waynesburg, I spent a lot of time in the Morgantown area and attended basketball and football games.

I’m going to watch my first baseball game. Springs. So I’m really excited to be a part of this scrim community now, that’s for sure. So really great. Right answer. Yay. Are there some basic common questions that your students often ask you who are considering coming here? Or is it more of a scripted thing that most people ask the same things the same way?

Yeah, that’s a wonderful question. So there is no prescribed script or routine that we follow with our students because they are all so different. And I think that’s why we love our work so much is that every student who applies or applies or wants to register with us at WVU Online really has their own story and background and reason for wanting to graduate. .

So we really tailor our conversations and. You know, ask questions because we want to, you don’t just want to sell. Of course, we hope that students will want to come to us, but we really want to help them find the best solution and make sure that what we offer matches their goals. Academically, professionally and personally.

So we definitely steer the conversations around each student, but there are some questions that seem to get asked a lot during accreditation. WVU accredited online and yes we go through the higher education commission. And so that’s the big problem. I think sometimes online education can have negative support that people can come up with, but we are definitely a brick and mortar institution with an online component.

And so we definitely have a long tradition in online education. And it’s not just something that stemmed from COVID or anything like that. So I think we’re really proud of what we offer and the students are really happy with their experience throughout their tenure with us and once they graduate.

So that’s definitely a big deal. Often they want to know how much it will cost, which is obviously a big concern for anyone who is about to invest in education. So what’s really great about WB Online is that a lot of our programs are the same. Per credit hour, regardless of where the student lives.

So a student could potentially live in California, Washington, Witchcraft, or West Virginia, and depending on their program, they often pay the same rate regardless of where they live. So it’s a really big and great feature that really enhances diversity. Within the online space and our courses.

So students really get a broad perspective on the topics as they have discussions, but then their classes and with that within their faculty members. And another big question we get is about the online courses themselves. They want to know. Are they asynchronous or do they have to be on on a certain day or time for a live class or are they able to work on their assignments and projects and post their discussions when they can?

Because we have a lot of students who are professionals coming back for a graduate degree. We have a lot of students finishing the bachelor of arts in the area who started college, maybe five, 10 years or more and they just have, they have all these credits, but they don’t have the degree to show it.

So there are often people who are very well established in their career and profession. And so they like that flexibility and being able to take classes when they can base it on their family, their work, and their personal schedules. So this is a very big problem that we get so often.

I really appreciate what you said in that you actually have a discussion with every student who is considering coming here and make sure that not only is the program well suited, but that it will match what they want to do. And that sort of thing. It’s really important when talking to students because you know, they have a reason to come back to school.

We don’t want to put them in a place that doesn’t suit them. So I really appreciate you doing this. And then of course all these other questions. Yes. They are important. And they will go up. Different times and means they can’t think of everything, you know, when they’re actually talking to someone, but being able to respond to you is great.

They said they can get all the information they might need. Jennifer, thank you so much for sharing with us today. We have covered a lot of topics that will really help future students. And thank you all for joining us today. I hope you will listen to future podcasts. Have a nice day.

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Older people can prevent memory decline by sticking to regular exercise http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/older-people-can-prevent-memory-decline-by-sticking-to-regular-exercise/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 20:48:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/older-people-can-prevent-memory-decline-by-sticking-to-regular-exercise/ We all know exercise is good for us, but that still leaves a lot of questions. How much exercise? Who benefits the most? And when in our lives? New research by psychologists at the University of Pittsburgh pools data from dozens of studies to answer these questions, showing that older adults may be able to […]]]>

We all know exercise is good for us, but that still leaves a lot of questions. How much exercise? Who benefits the most? And when in our lives? New research by psychologists at the University of Pittsburgh pools data from dozens of studies to answer these questions, showing that older adults may be able to prevent the decline of a certain type of memory by getting older. by sticking to regular exercise.

Everyone always asks, ‘How much should I exercise? What is the bare minimum to see an improvement? » . From our study, it appears that exercising about three times a week for at least four months is what you need to reap the benefits of episodic memory.”


Sarah Aghjayan, lead author, doctoral student in clinical psychology and health biology at the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences

Episodic memory is one that deals with events that happened to you in the past. It is also one of the first to decline with age. “I usually like to talk about the first time you got behind the wheel of a car,” Aghjayan said. “So you might remember where you were, how old you were, who was in the passenger seat explaining things to you, that feeling of excitement.”

Heart-pounding exercise has shown promise for improving brain health, and experiments in mice show it improves memory -; but studies investigating the same link in humans are mixed.

Seeking to clear the muddy waters of the scientific literature, the team looked at 1,279 studies, ultimately whittling them down to just 36 that met specific criteria. Then they used specialized software and a large number of Excel spreadsheets to transform the data information into a form where the different studies could be directly compared.

This work paid off when they found that pooling these 36 studies together was enough to show that for older people, exercise can indeed benefit their memory. The team, including Aghjayan’s adviser Kirk Erickson in the Department of Psychology and other researchers from Pitt, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Iowa, published their findings in the journal Communication Medicine February 17.

Past analyzes looking at links between exercise and memory have found none, but Aghjayan and his team took several additional steps to give them the best chance of finding a link if one existed. They limited their research to particular groups and age groups as well as a specific type of rigorous experimental design. Another key was to focus specifically on episodic memory, which is supported by a part of the brain known to benefit from exercise.

“When we combine and merge all of this data, it allows us to look at nearly 3,000 participants,” Aghjayan said. “Each individual study is very important: they all contribute to science in a significant way.” However, individual studies may not find models that actually exist due to a lack of resources to conduct a large enough experiment. The studies individually could not find a link between exercise and memory -; all of the research had to be looked at to develop the model.

With this much larger group of participants, the team was able to show a link between exercise and episodic memory, but also could begin to answer more specific questions about who benefits and how.

“We found that there were greater memory improvements in people aged 55 to 68 compared to those aged 69 to 85 – so it’s better to intervene earlier,” he said. Aghjayan. The team also found the greatest effects of exercise in those who had not yet experienced cognitive decline and in studies where participants exercised regularly several times a week.

There are still questions to be answered. The team’s analysis couldn’t answer how exercise intensity affects memory benefits, and there’s a lot to learn about the mechanism behind this link. But the public health implications are clear: Exercise is an accessible way for older people to stave off memory decline, benefiting themselves, their caregivers and the healthcare system, Aghjayan said. .

“You just need a good pair of walking shoes, and you can get out there and move your body.”

Source:

Journal reference:

Aghjayan, SL, et al. (2022) Aerobic Exercise Improves Episodic Memory in Late Adulthood: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Communication Medicine. doi.org/10.1038/s43856-022-00079-7.

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Luke named first Horowitz professor of social policy – The Source http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/luke-named-first-horowitz-professor-of-social-policy-the-source/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 06:01:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/luke-named-first-horowitz-professor-of-social-policy-the-source/ Douglas Lukea leading researcher in public health policy, systems science, and tobacco control at the Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis, has been named the first Irving Louis Horowitz Professor of Social Policy . An installation ceremony was held on October 12 at Hillman Hall. “Doug’s tireless work in systems science and tobacco […]]]>

Douglas Lukea leading researcher in public health policy, systems science, and tobacco control at the Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis, has been named the first Irving Louis Horowitz Professor of Social Policy .

An installation ceremony was held on October 12 at Hillman Hall.

“Doug’s tireless work in systems science and tobacco control is helping to improve lives around the world,” said Mary McKay, vice provost for interdisciplinary initiatives and former dean of the Brown School. “His efforts make evidence-based public health policy immediately effective for all of us.”

“Doug Luke is a renowned tobacco regulatory and health policy expert who tackles important public health issues in his work,” said Chancellor Andrew D. Martin. “It is fitting that he is the first holder of a chair named in honor of Irving Louis Horowitz, whose lifelong research focused on pressing problems of social policy.”

Luke directs work primarily focused on the evaluation, dissemination and implementation of evidence-based public health policy.

Over the past decade, he has used systems science methods, in particular social network analysis and agent-based modeling, to solve important public health problems.

He published the first review articles on network analysis in public health in 2007 and on systems science methods in public health in 2012. He has written books on multilevel modeling and analysis of network.

Luke

Luke runs the university Public Health Systems Science Center. Under his leadership, the center used network analysis to study the diffusion of scientific innovations, to model the formation of organizational collaborations, and to study the relationship between mentorship and future scientific collaboration.

In addition to his appointment at the Brown School, Luke is a member of the Public Health Institutedirector of evaluation for the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences and founding member of the Washington University Network of Dissemination and Implementation Researchers. He served on a panel for the Institute of Medicine that produced a national report on the use of agent-based modeling for tobacco regulatory science.

According to a 2019 PLOS Biology bibliometric analysis, Luke ranked in the top 1% of scientists in the world based on the number of most-cited papers.

Luke received a bachelor’s degree with honors in psychology and German for the arts and sciences from Washington University in St. Louis in 1983. At the University of Illinois, he received a master’s degree in 1988 and a doctorate in 1990 , both in psychology.

Horowitz’s Legacy

The Irving Louis Horowitz Professorship in Social Policy was established in 2020 by Mary Curtis Horowitz to honor her late husband’s contributions to the advancement of social policy and to support ongoing research and teaching in this area.

“Professor Luke exemplifies the kind of social science that Irving championed throughout his life: research based on evidence, not ideology, and research focused on pressing questions of social policy, rather than an ivory tower,” said Mary Curtis Horowitz. “Doug Luke tackles real-world problems and unravels what works and what doesn’t and uses innovative approaches to address important public policy concerns. It’s the kind of work that inspires confidence in what we social scientists can do, and it’s the kind of work that will guide us all to a better world.

Visit by Luke and Mary Curtis Horowitz before the installation ceremony. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/University of Washington)

Irving Louis Horowitz (1929-2012) was the Hannah Arendt Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Political Science at Rutgers University. Throughout his career, he taught at many institutions around the world, including the University of Washington from 1963 to 1969. He served as chair of the sociology departments at Hobart and William Smith colleges, University of Washington and Rutgers University. Horowitz also served as Chairman of the Board and Editorial Director of Transaction Publishers.

A prolific writer, Horowitz is the author of more than 50 books, many of which have appeared in translation and multiple editions, as well as hundreds of articles and essays. He has published books on a range of topics from political theory, education and academic affairs to public policy and publishing affairs. He was widely considered the authoritative voice on Cuban communism. Horowitz has received numerous awards for his contribution to public life.

In 2010, Penn State University announced that the “Irving Louis Horowitz Publishers Archive – Transaction, 1939-2009” was open for public search in the Historical Collections and Penn State Labor Archives of the Special Collections Library of the Eberly Family, University Libraries. The archives document the expansion of social science research over the past half century.

Mary Curtis Horowitz leads the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy as president and is also one of its trustees. The foundation supports the advancement of social science research with a policy focus. Its specific mission is to award scholarships to aspiring doctoral students who support their thesis research. Since its creation in 1997, the foundation has granted grants to 250 researchers in more than 100 universities around the world.

She also sits on the board of a human rights organization, the Center for a Free Cuba, and is committed to literacy advocacy and other public service activities. In the past, she has served on the board of MIT Press, the board of the Society for Scholarly Publishing, and various publishing industry committees.

Under the name of Mary E. Curtis, her professional name, she worked for 45 years in academic publishing. Until 2017, she was President and Chair of the Board of Transaction Publishers. Previously, she was vice president at Wiley Publishers, where she led its journal publishing division, and was editorial director of an academic publishing unit at CBS Publishing.

A 1968 graduate of the University of Washington, she found ways to support the institution that put her on her path. She serves on the Brown School National Council and sponsors a series of lectures on social policy at the school. It also provided support to university libraries and endowed an arts and science scholarship.

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Editorial: Course policies unfairly expect in-person attendance http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/editorial-course-policies-unfairly-expect-in-person-attendance/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 05:17:45 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/editorial-course-policies-unfairly-expect-in-person-attendance/ As many classes are returning to an in-person format, Tufts students who remain in isolation or quarantine due to positive COVID-19 tests or contact tracing continue to face many difficulties with to classmates who can attend each class session. In response, sSome professors remain aware of the challenges that an absence related to COVID-19 can […]]]>

As many classes are returning to an in-person format, Tufts students who remain in isolation or quarantine due to positive COVID-19 tests or contact tracing continue to face many difficulties with to classmates who can attend each class session. In response, sSome professors remain aware of the challenges that an absence related to COVID-19 can cause and have adjusted their program accordingly. However, many have re-enacted pre-pandemic class policies that impose a cost on missing a lecture or attend virtually due to exposure to COVID-19.

Amid the ongoing pandemic, it is essential that students remain able to complete their classes even when they cannot be physically present in the classroom.

In Brain and Behavior, a psychology course offered at Tufts, exams are only offered in an in-person format during class hours, unless otherwise specified. The lesson involves three non-cumulative exams and optional final cover material of the entire semester, of which the three of the four highest exams are counted in the student’s grade. the last exam is designed as a “retake test”, and sstudents who miss any of the previous exams are required to take the final.

Along the same lines, the Introduction to the The Algorithms class requires students to complete ongoing weekly quizzes to ensure students stay current on the material. The oThe only way to take the quiz is to attend class in person at the time it is administered, and there are no face-painting or virtual options for students who miss classes due to COVID-19.

These courses claim to address potential absences related to COVID-19 through specific policies in their programs. For example, in the Introduction to Algorithms course, the two lowest marks of the current quiz are dropped. According to course staff, this policy was implemented to “accommodate students who may not be able to attend due to illness or other reasons”.

Despite the best intentions, policies like these encourage students to attend class as much as possible so they can maximize the number of assessments from which a grade can be taken. This can encourage students to go against university politicswho asks students who are not feeling well to come to campus. Requiring students to be in person for assessments thwarts Tufts’ COVID-19 mitigation strategy and advice from public health experts.

While such policies were common in many courses prior to COVID-19, many professors have changed their course modality, allowing for hybrid attendance and increased flexibility during the pandemic. Indeed, it may be too early to abandon such accommodations in the age of the pandemic.

the the university has ostensibly done a lot progress in his fight against COVID-19; yet, we remain in a pandemic period, where the stability of in-person attendance is still somewhat precarious. Professors need to implement course policies for this new environment, in which students should not feel pressured to attend every class session in person, especially since, despite the drop in the number of cases at both in Tufts and in Massachusetts, last week the the university reported 135 cases of COVID-19.

Ideally, if a student is feeling ill, they should be able to feel comfortable staying in their dorm or home until they test negative for COVID-19 and communicate this need to their teachers. Students should certainly not feel even remotely pressured to attend lectures for fear of missing a graded assignment.

Additionally, students who test positive for COVID-19 should not be academically penalized for their diagnosis. COVID-19 positive students are already facing an uphill battle to recover from their illness, adapt to isolation in The Mods and resume their studies while taking classes virtually – they don’t need the added burden of missing graded assignments.

Professors should align their course policies with current Tufts COVID-19 guidelines in a way that does not academically punish students who self-isolate for COVID-19 or encourage those who may be ill to attend class. This pressure to go to class when he is sick could ppotentially putting classmates, faculty, and staff at risk of exposure. More PTeachers, some of whom may have young children who still cannot get vaccinated, are often more at risk from the effects of COVID-19 than students.

As the mid-term season is about to begin, it is imperative that students feel well supported in case they are unable to attend exams in person. Especially on condition that Tufts policy encourages sick students to stay home until they test negative., course policies must be aligned to promote the health of students and staff. We encourage administration to work with instructors to find strategies to mitigate course policy challenges and to support students who must miss classes due to illness.

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How Psychiatry Shaped My View of Cannabis http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-psychiatry-shaped-my-view-of-cannabis/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 22:05:15 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-psychiatry-shaped-my-view-of-cannabis/ The privilege given to psychiatrists to hear the most intimate facets of people’s lives, combined with the authority and responsibility to administer medication appropriately and safely, gives them a unique perspective on cannabis use. First, cannabis beautifully illustrates the direct connection between our brain and our mind. Even small amounts of molecules produced by cannabis […]]]>

The privilege given to psychiatrists to hear the most intimate facets of people’s lives, combined with the authority and responsibility to administer medication appropriately and safely, gives them a unique perspective on cannabis use.

First, cannabis beautifully illustrates the direct connection between our brain and our mind. Even small amounts of molecules produced by cannabis plants (mainly THC and CBD) significantly alter the basic texture of our experience. The brain is a colony of individual nerve cells, called neurons. Neurons are basically single-celled organisms that can live independently when placed in a petri dish. Together, the approximately 86 billion neurons that make up our brain are so delicately and intimately interconnected with each other that they control the muscles of the body, affecting what we hear, see, smell, feel and think.

Above all, this nearly three-pound colony of coordinated neurons also generates our conscious experience. How consciousness emerges from this neural activity is not fully understood, but is directly experienced by all of us. And when the chemistry of cannabis changes the way our neurons interact with each other, we feel very different.

As scientists cracked the mystery of how THC and CBD interact with neurons to get us high, they uncovered fundamental secrets about how the brain works. The inherent brain chemistry that cannabis resin closely mimics is responsible for regulating all neurotransmitter systems in the brain, such as dopamine, serotonin, GABA, etc. This inherent system is the master neurotransmitter, and cannabis energizes this master regulatory system far above its normal level. .

Unlike most other psychoactive drugs, the consciousness altered by cannabis remains intact. But what we are aware of is altered enough that we see the world, outside and inside, differently (see my article, “How Cannabis Makes Everything So Interesting”). The mind and the brain are linked together, and little illustrates this and the experience of cannabis. For many people, this is a great experience.

Second, psychiatrists stand at the bottom of an escalator that delivers the most severely mentally ill. People with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and others disabled by mental illness walk into our offices, pleading for any relief we may have to offer, which often involves medication. As a result, and because I have practiced addiction psychiatry, I have seen many more people who have been harmed by cannabis use at too early an age, too often, too much, or in the face of other complicated mental issues than the average person.

Overstimulation of the brain’s master neurotransmitter system eventually weakens it, disrupting the regulation of the rest of the brain’s chemistry (see my article “How Cannabis Breaks Down When Used Too Frequently”). As an emergency physician who has repeatedly witnessed the carnage of gun violence, I have repeatedly seen the lives of teenagers upended and twisted by devotion to cannabis in ways that change the trajectory of their future. On the one hand, I know that epidemiology shows that these disasters affect a small minority of those who have tried cannabis. But, on the other hand, I’ve seen the wrecks and know that harm is possible, even when it’s not the norm.

Third, I have seen the reality of the medical benefits of cannabis and understand why modifications to the brain’s inherent master cannabinoid neurotransmitter system can treat physical illness. In addition to altering our inherent cannabinoid chemistry, THC and CBD are also powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant agents. Just as herbal medicines in the past have given way to safer and more potent drugs with known doses (e.g. foxglove tea leading to foxglove for heart failure), raw cannabis will lead to a range of newer, safer and more powerful drugs to combat pain, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, autoimmune and degenerative diseases, to name but a few.

All drugs have unexpected side effects, and that includes medical cannabis. Addiction is just one of many possible negative side effects. For example, people with multiple sclerosis may experience significant relief from painful muscle spasms, but those who use cannabis for this relief have unfortunately been shown to experience an early decline in cognitive functioning. Continued daily cannabis use, even for legitimate medical purposes, can lead to a subtle decrease in memory, executive functions, the ability to assess the likelihood of risk, and even sensitivity to subtle emotional cues. All drugs, and especially potent drugs, should be given only when well-diagnosed conditions have a reasonable expectation of benefit, and with careful monitoring for potential adverse side effects and adverse interactions with other drugs. The medical use of cannabis products has a role to play, but it must be treated with the same care, discretion and oversight that we expect to receive from any potent pharmaceutical drug.

Finally, I have seen political and moral polarization create such a damaging debate about cannabis that meaningful dialogue is sidelined. Those who oppose cannabis and those who care about public health are using both science and data to confront cannabis advocates. They make the mistake of believing that objective facts are more important and more compelling than the subjective experience of the Cannabis Culture community. Those who use cannabis for recreational, spiritual or medicinal purposes attribute significant personal meaning to their experience. When hammered with objective facts by those who haven’t listened, don’t understand or, frankly, don’t respect the meaning of people’s direct experience with cannabis, the Cannabis Culture community turns a deaf ear and is postponed. One of the most fundamental lessons that practicing psychiatry has taught me is that what I think is often less important to others than having what they think heard first.

Essential reading in psychiatry

I have summarized the objective facts discovered by science in my book From bud to brain (2020), but I quickly became unhappy with how it only told half the story of cannabis, fascinating as the scientific story is. The other half, subjective, now told in Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystic of Cannabis (2022), is equally fascinating. This half, like much good psychiatry, involves more listening than telling.

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Can mobile phone apps improve your mental health? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-mobile-phone-apps-improve-your-mental-health/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:49:51 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-mobile-phone-apps-improve-your-mental-health/ The mental health apps industry is booming, but scientists and clinicians are questioning whether these apps are safe and effective. A meta-review of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health shows limited evidence of their overall effectiveness, but the results are “strongly suggestive” of some benefits. Other research shows that when used appropriately, some mental health […]]]>

  • The mental health apps industry is booming, but scientists and clinicians are questioning whether these apps are safe and effective.
  • A meta-review of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health shows limited evidence of their overall effectiveness, but the results are “strongly suggestive” of some benefits.
  • Other research shows that when used appropriately, some mental health apps can enhance the therapeutic process.

Venture capitalists and online developers are taking advantage of the growing demand for therapeutic apps and other mobile phone interventions for mental health.

In fact, the mental health apps market is expected to exceed $3.3 billion by 2027, marking an annual growth rate of 20.5% from 2021. According to the American Psychological Association (APA)the growing interest of private equity firms investing in mental health apps has been largely fueled by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recent reports suggest up to 20,000 Mental health apps exist today, with Headspace and Calm among the most widely used options.

But whether mental health apps and text-based interventions actually work remains to be seen.

A meta-review published in January 2022 looked at the effectiveness of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health symptoms, including:

The review included the results of 14 meta-analyses with 47,940 participants in 145 randomized controlled trials. The authors looked at a wide range of mobile phone-based interventions, such as:

Virtual therapy visits with mental health professionals were not part of the study.

Based on the data analyzed, the researchers found no convincing evidence that cellphone-based interventions effectively treated people’s symptoms.

However, the results showed “highly suggestive evidence” that cellphone-based interventions had the potential to improve anxiety, depression and stress. They also suggested that SMS interventions could help people quit smoking. The researchers recommended that more research be conducted to explore these avenues.

Simon B. GoldbergPhD, assistant professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and lead author of the study, said that while previous research suggests some benefits for smartphone-based interventions, the therapeutic alliance between client and advisor continues to be beneficial for overall efficiency.

“I suspect that humans simply react more strongly to interpersonal influences from living humans than to fully or partially automated technology,” Goldberg told Psych Central.

“Human connection is especially powerful, especially when dealing with mental health issues.”

As the technology for smartphone-based interventions continues to develop, Goldberg said the methods may yield better results. For example, machine learning-based algorithms could personalize content to tailor an individual’s therapeutic experience.

“It’s also possible that these interventions are only moderately effective on average,” Goldberg said, adding that some interventions, like CBT-based applications, may be more effective than others.

“It still allows for the possibility that some people will benefit a lot (while others will benefit very little), as well as the possibility that the technologies will be a useful first line of assistance or prevention.”

C.Vaile WrightPhD, senior director of healthcare innovation at APA, said one of the biggest challenges in the field of mental health apps is the lack of standardization and regulation, which includes research, rigorous testing and verification.

As such, some critics have called the mental health app industry “Wild West therapy.”

“As a consumer, it can be really difficult to figure out what’s good and what’s not, and then what’s effective and what’s not effective,” Wright said over the phone.

Many mental health apps aren’t grounded in psychological science, with some spreading false mental health information or leading to undesirable results.

According to Wright, possible risks associated with mental health apps can include anything from increasing symptomatology to disabling the therapeutic process.

“That would probably be our biggest concern — not that it doesn’t help at all, but that it actually hurts,” Wright said.

Goldberg’s study notes that mobile phone-based interventions could be considered a cost-effective way to reduce mental health symptoms and help people quit smoking.

He also notes that more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these interventions for today’s digitally-focused youth.

According to Wright, mental health apps might be more helpful to “digital natives,” like young people and teens, compared to some adults. She said other groups who are less likely to seek traditional therapies, such as men, could also benefit.

“Similarly, for individuals in communities of color, this could be an intervention that connects some of that health equity gapadded Wright. “But I don’t think we know that right now.”

Other advantages

With mental illness affecting Tens of millions in the United States each year, mental health apps have the potential to reach wider populations than traditional psychotherapy.

Wright said that even before the pandemic, the field of mental health care was facing a labor shortage, leading to a large number of unmet needs for mental health interventions.

“We need to think more innovatively about how we are going to approach the public health of our country – and I think technology is a clear path for us to do that because it is more accessible; because it can be more affordable,” she said.

Like a recent APA article notes, mental health apps may also get more people into therapy.

Wright said mental health apps could also help break down stigma-related barriers because you can use them with a degree of anonymity, compared to a visit to a psychotherapist’s office.

It’s important to note that mental health apps are not designed to replace a conversation with a therapist or medical treatment. Some people use both together, and research from 2020 suggests that mental health apps can enhance the face-to-face therapeutic process with a professional.

Wright said as a consumer, it’s a good idea to do your homework before trying any mental health apps. Websites like One Mind Psyber Guide Rate and review different mental health apps to provide you with more information than just relying on star ratings in the app store.

You may also want to know how a mental health app will use your data and if it is sold or protected.

“The wellness app space is an unregulated area,” Wright said. “That means nobody tells them they have to protect your private health information from hackers, so it becomes really critical that consumers read the fine print.”

Despite the volume of existing research, therapeutic applications and other text-based technologies are still relatively new and constantly being improved.

While the overall effectiveness of these technologies for mental health issues remains questionable, there are also consistent evidence that they can provide a modest benefit.

“This could still have a major impact on public health, although a certain proportion of users need more intensive intervention to benefit,” Goldberg said.

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Effective WHO psychological intervention to prevent mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/effective-who-psychological-intervention-to-prevent-mental-disorders-among-syrian-refugees-in-turkey/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:29:20 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/effective-who-psychological-intervention-to-prevent-mental-disorders-among-syrian-refugees-in-turkey/ A self-help psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization, Self-Help Plus, has been effective in preventing the onset of mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey, according to a study published today in World Psychiatry. The study, the first randomized controlled trial on the prevention of mental disorders conducted among Syrian refugees suffering from […]]]>

A self-help psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization, Self-Help Plus, has been effective in preventing the onset of mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey, according to a study published today in World Psychiatry. The study, the first randomized controlled trial on the prevention of mental disorders conducted among Syrian refugees suffering from psychological distress but without a diagnosis of a mental disorder, found that the odds of having a mental disorder six months after the intervention were d. ‘About half for participants receiving Self -Help Plus compared to those in the control arm.

Almost all of the 642 adults enrolled in the trial, which ended in June 2020, were from Syria, with others from Iraq, the Occupied Palestinian Territory and Yemen. The average age of participants was 31, with almost 63% female. Half of the participants received Self-Help Plus and Enhanced Care As Usual (ECAU, consisting of support and / or social care provided on a routine basis) and half received ECAU alone.

A format provided by facilitators trained in a group setting

Self-Help Plus (SH +) is based on Acceptance and Engagement Therapy, a form of cognitive behavioral therapy. It consists of a pre-recorded audio course, delivered by non-specialized trained facilitators in a group setting and supplemented by an illustrated self-help book adapted to the target cultural group. Audio material provides information on stress management and guides participants through individual exercises and small group discussions. The self-help book covers all essential content and concepts. In accordance with the structure of the intervention, during the trial in Turkey, the course was delivered in five sessions of 2 hours.

In the trial in Turkey, supported by the European Commission, Self-Help Plus participants were significantly less likely to have mental disorders at six-month follow-up compared to the ECAU group (22% vs. 41%). The risk reduction appeared to be similar for the most common diagnoses of mental disorders – depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety disorders. Consistent with this, Self-Help Plus participants also showed improvements in symptoms of depression, self-identified psychological findings, and quality of life during a six-month follow-up.

Potential for expansion to other large refugee populations

Considering the magnitude of the effect observed in the study and the fact that Self-Help Plus can be provided to large groups of up to 30 participants at a time by lay facilitators after a short training, the results of the trial suggest that the intervention could be scaled up as a public health strategy to prevent mental disorders in large refugee populations exposed to continuing adversity. However, since the intervention does not address the determinants of refugee mental health issues, it must be applied with a strong advocacy for the protection of those facing adversity and for services that meet their needs. broader social, physical and mental health.

Significant need for mental health support among refugee populations

In 2020, the number of forcibly displaced people around the world, 80 million, was the highest since World War II. Among them, 26 million fled their country because of violence or persecution. The largest group of refugees came from Syria, representing 6.6 million people. An estimated 3.6 million Syrian refugees are currently living in Turkey. The WHO estimates that the rates of depression, PTSD and any mental disorder among people exposed to conflict over the past 10 years are 11%, 15% and 22%, respectively.

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