young people – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 10:00:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png young people – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 hint, it’s not your fault http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/hint-its-not-your-fault/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 06:55:53 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/hint-its-not-your-fault/ Almost three-quarters of parents worry that their children’s use of mobile devices will be harmful to them or to family relationships – and this is apparent from research carried out before the pandemic. But it is not the fault of the parents or the children. Every time a parent and child try to turn off […]]]>

Almost three-quarters of parents worry that their children’s use of mobile devices will be harmful to them or to family relationships – and this is apparent from research carried out before the pandemic.

But it is not the fault of the parents or the children. Every time a parent and child try to turn off a game or put down a device, they’re not fighting — they’re fighting the invisible army of behavioral design specialists who make tech experiences so hard to pull off.

People who create apps and games use knowledge and experts from an area of ​​psychological research called “persuasive design,” whose researchers seek to understand how to create something that’s nearly impossible to put down.

But it’s important to be careful when trying to get kids hooked on something, as psychologist Richard Freed and I explain in our analysis of the ethical issues of persuasive design for children and adolescents. .


A quick introduction

Simply put, persuasive design combines behavioral psychology with technology to alter human behavior. It’s the answer to the age-old question, “Why are kids so glued to devices?”

The most basic summary is that there are three key mechanisms that together can change a person’s behavior: creating strong motivation, requiring little effort, and frequently inducing users to engage.

Knowing these principles can have productive and useful purposes, such as encouraging people to walk more or eat more fruits and vegetables. However, a common use of persuasive design is to increase the amount of time a person spends using a particular app or game. This increases the number of ads the person will see and the possibility of them buying something in-game, which increases the income of the app designer.

Adults are also influenced by persuasive design. That’s why they binge-watch streaming shows, endlessly scroll through social media, and usually play video games.

But because children’s brains are so malleable, children are especially susceptible to persuasive design strategies. Many parents have observed children’s exceptional enthusiasm for receiving stickers and tokens, whether physical or digital. Indeed, the ventral striatum, the pleasure center of the brain, is more sensitive to dopamine, the brain’s reward chemical, in children’s brains than in adult brains.

This excitement leads them to want to repeat the behavior to experience the neurological rewards over and over again.

In a 2019 survey of teenage screen time, three types of heavy users emerged from the data, all of which are influenced by persuasive design: social media users, video gamers, and viewers.

How it works

Social media sites like Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, and Snapchat are designed to maximize the results of persuasive design. Using “like” buttons and heart-shaped emoticons, these sites provide social signals, like acceptance and approval, that teens are highly motivated to seek out. Scrolling through sites requires very little effort. And apps trigger regular re-engagement through continuous notifications and prompts.

Snapchat, for example, urges users to send Snaps at least every 24 hours to keep their Snapstreak alive. To avoid the stress of missing their friends’ reactions or updates, kids are increasingly checking social media.

In video games, Fortnite lets players know how close they are to beating an opponent. This triggers the “near miss” phenomenon, encouraging people to keep playing because they were so close they might win next time. This is just one of the ways persuasive design has been adapted from adult gaming systems to digital video games for children.

Ethical Concerns

As a specialist in psychology, I fear that psychologists help designers of technologies to use the principles of psychology to manipulate children and adolescents in order to increase their use of an app, game or a particular website.

At the same time, other psychologists are studying the harms of these activities, including anxiety, depression, attention problems, and obesity.

Other psychologists have opened treatment centers to treat Internet gaming disorder and other mental health issues associated with excessive and problematic use, such as anxiety and depression.

In my opinion, the principles of a domain should not both create and address a problem. The American Psychological Association, the largest professional association for psychologists in America, has a code of ethics requiring psychologists to do no harm, to oppose work that does not benefit the well-being of people, and to do especially careful when dealing with young people because they are not yet fully mature.

As such, I believe psychologists have an obligation to protect children from the influences of persuasive technology. Researchers who help social media sites and games may think they’re just trying to help companies create the most dynamic and engaging products possible. But the reality is that they turn a blind eye to the many psychological harms that research has shown these products cause.

Parents and children are rightly concerned about the extent to which games, videos and social media are designed to exploit children’s impressionable minds. Psychologists could strive to explain to parents and children how children’s brains develop and how persuasive design harnesses this process. It can help families stop arguing about spending too much time with their devices and recognize that the biggest threat isn’t the devices themselves, but rather the companies that design these devices and apps for them. that they are so difficult to deactivate.

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How Social Media Can Help or Hurt in a Disaster http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-social-media-can-help-or-hurt-in-a-disaster/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 01:19:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-social-media-can-help-or-hurt-in-a-disaster/ Modern fandom largely takes place on social media. Instead of writing fan letters or subscribing to paper “zines” to connect with other like-minded people, fans come together in online communities to celebrate the things they love. . Platforms like Twitter, TikTok, Facebook, Tumblr, and more give fans a virtual place to gather and chat about […]]]>

Modern fandom largely takes place on social media. Instead of writing fan letters or subscribing to paper “zines” to connect with other like-minded people, fans come together in online communities to celebrate the things they love. . Platforms like Twitter, TikTok, Facebook, Tumblr, and more give fans a virtual place to gather and chat about their favorite TV shows, movies, bands, and celebrities. The resulting sense of belonging has mental health benefits as fans bond and make friends. Within these online communities there is often an encouragement of creativity which is also beneficial as fans hone their writing, artistic and creative skills.

However, there are downsides to using social media as well. The recent onslaught of disturbing images of war, climate disasters, school shootings and pandemic casualties can turn social media into a minefield. Between light memes about Spiderman and Batman, there’s coverage of the latest news and events, many of which relate to these natural and man-made disasters.

The impact of exposure, even from a distance

For young people accustomed to spending a lot of time on their phones, the high degree of exposure can have a significant psychological impact. Someone who directly experiences one of these stressful life events is at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder, but even those who view images of these disasters on a screen can be affected. Anxiety and even post-traumatic stress symptoms can result from secondary exposure to disturbing content.

Our understanding of who is at risk for developing these symptoms has changed over the past few decades. In the wake of the 9/11 attack, research has shown that the idea that someone had to be close to an event to be significantly impacted (the traditional bullseye disaster impact model) n was not necessarily true. Instead, individuals perform a relative risk assessment to gauge the threat the event poses, with physical proximity being only part of this calculation.

The other thing that has changed over the past few decades that may impact our risk assessment is the psychological closeness that our near-constant connection to social media has produced. The news is not limited to half-hour segments on evening television; it’s constant, 24 hours a day, on several platforms. Networks and news outlets compete for viewers by providing as comprehensive and graphic coverage as possible. When something happens anywhere in the world, pictures and videos and constant social media coverage can make that event seem much closer than it seems – geographic proximity n is more necessary for us to feel like something is happening in our own backyard.

Several recent studies have shown that greater media exposure after a disaster like a hurricane was associated with more post-traumatic stress symptoms in preteens, especially those whose brains were less efficient at regulating emotional arousal. For young people in particular, the greater time spent on social media and the cognitive skills needed to make this relative risk assessment could contribute to an increased risk of anxiety symptoms.

Set Social Media Boundaries

Social media platforms have been criticized for not doing more to protect young people from being exposed to disturbing content. A few months ago, popular social media platform TikTok came under fire for a trend of showing videos of school shooting threats. The videos did not name specific schools, but were of sufficient concern to cause some schools to close and invariably impacted young people’s relative risk ratings.

So how can we all navigate the good and bad of social media? We can all take breaks, especially when so many stressful events are happening. We can also organize our social media so that not everything we see is news coverage. Fans use social media in a positive way by interacting with other fans or setting aside time for a brief escape from the stresses of everyday life by consuming fan cams, memes, fan art or fan fiction. Fans are also resourceful in finding ways to process the troubling events around them in a way that leaves some hope.

“Memifying” as a coping strategy

For example, while the war in Ukraine has received disturbing and even graphic coverage of the war in Ukraine, people have also taken to social media to cope. Between media coverage on most platforms, there are viral memes that re-characterize events in Ukraine in a way that can help create hope. There are memes of Zelenskyy and Putin being recast as Marvel or Star Wars characters, for example, comparing real-life events to the familiar story of the “little guy” standing up against an oppressor. Much like fans use fictional characters in fan fiction to revise their own life stories, these memes are a way to adapt the narrative to seem less hopeless, thereby reducing stress and anxiety.

A recent Vice article described the “memification” of the Ukrainian situation, pointing out that this practice can help simplify a complicated and hard-to-accept situation into something easier to understand – a process that is taking place in the print media well. before social media. existed. Memes can be a way to reduce the stress and feelings of helplessness that come from watching the violence unfold. On the other hand, there is a risk of oversimplifying what is really going on and one should keep in mind that these are real people in dangerous real-life situations, not super- heroes with superpowers. There are also many TikToks and fan cams that portray Zelenskyy and Putin and others, sometimes humorously. While some have criticized the tone of these posts which reference a real-life tragedy, these may also be a way to deal with the overwhelming emotions caused by the reality of this war.

Some of the memes don’t so much revise reality as they highlight parts of it. For example, the bravery of individual Ukrainians – a man carrying a landmine across the road with his bare hands or a group of civilians trying to convince approaching tanks to turn back, that people turned into memes portraying them as real-life superheroes. Sharing these inspirational memes can be a way to feel like there’s hope, reducing feelings of helplessness that increase anxiety. While we should never lose sight of the reality and gravity of these situations, in a time when the world seems out of control in so many ways, this can be a good thing.

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Mental health should be a priority as cases rise among students – psychologist http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/mental-health-should-be-a-priority-as-cases-rise-among-students-psychologist/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 05:23:42 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/mental-health-should-be-a-priority-as-cases-rise-among-students-psychologist/ University students feeling anxious and uncertain about the Covid-19 outbreak should try not to become totally preoccupied with the pandemic, a psychologist says. Photo: RNZ / Richard Tindiller Students living in halls of residence say almost everyone they know has the virus and those who haven’t caught it think it’s only a matter of time […]]]>

University students feeling anxious and uncertain about the Covid-19 outbreak should try not to become totally preoccupied with the pandemic, a psychologist says.

Photo: RNZ / Richard Tindiller

Students living in halls of residence say almost everyone they know has the virus and those who haven’t caught it think it’s only a matter of time before they too are infected.

Orientation week is usually a riot of parties and socializing, but students on campus – some of whom are living away from home for the first time – are now locked in their rooms.

Kerry Gibson, professor of psychology at the University of Auckland, said nine at noon the Omicron outbreak is a great source of uncertainty and anxiety for students already dealing with big life changes.

“University brings its own challenges for young people and their mental health anyway. It’s a bit of a double whammy,” she said.

Professor Gibson said students should recognize this is a difficult situation and make sure they connect with whānau and their friends.

“You don’t want to completely worry about it,” she said.

“The most helpful thing we can do is say to each other, look, this is an unusually difficult situation, I have every right to feel a bit at sea here and to find things a bit difficult and I need to give me time to settle in.

“It’s a chapter of the book, it’s not the whole book, it’s a time when things are difficult.”

Professor Gibson said parents should have empathy for their children, who often face enormous pressure to succeed.

About 60% of active cases of Aotearoa have been recorded in people under the age of 30.

Chief Health Officer Ashley Bloomfield called the start of the academic year “a nationwide superspread event”.

Victoria University of Wellington’s case count hovers between around 600 and 850 among the 2,500 students in its halls.

Additional staff have joined their accommodation team to provide meals and wellness checks to students self-isolating in their rooms.

AUT says 209 of its 712 resident students are self-isolating with the virus or because they are contacts.

The University of Auckland has around 450 infected residents.

The universities of Otago, Canterbury and Massey did not provide RNZ with the number of cases in their halls of residence.

Most students attend virtual classes, although some universities offer a mix of online and in-person learning.

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What to know about teen porn exposure http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/what-to-know-about-teen-porn-exposure/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 21:24:26 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/what-to-know-about-teen-porn-exposure/ Far from watching a sultry magazine centerfold, today’s teens watch porn videos online with motion and sound, depicting every potential sex act imaginable. The Internet, which has been called the “triple A engine” because of its affordability, accessibility, and anonymity (Cooper, 1998), has radically changed the pornography industry; yet its effects on adolescent development are […]]]>

Far from watching a sultry magazine centerfold, today’s teens watch porn videos online with motion and sound, depicting every potential sex act imaginable. The Internet, which has been called the “triple A engine” because of its affordability, accessibility, and anonymity (Cooper, 1998), has radically changed the pornography industry; yet its effects on adolescent development are still being felt.

What do we know?

Exposure to pornography during adolescence is becoming the norm rather than the exception. For example, among a sample of American high school students, 56% had seen pornography in the previous year (Maheaux et al., 2021). In another study of young Americans in their late teens, 80.3% reported accessing pornography (Astle et al., 2020). Researchers studying pornography among Dutch teenagers (aged 13-17) noted: “Over 70% of the teenagers in our sample had ever used [sexually explicit internet material] initially, suggesting that it is now an integral part of adolescent development” (Vandenbosch & Peter, 2016, p.516).

How do you access pornography? Data from PornHub Insights revealed that 86% of site traffic comes from mobile devices. Additionally, using smartphones to access free pornography online is the most common way to view pornographic material (Herbenick et al., 2020; Ma & Shek, 2013). Therefore, pornographic material can be viewed anytime, anywhere via smartphones.

What is the problem?

Is the fact that 68.4% of adolescents said they have watched pornography at some point in their life a cause for concern (Wright et al., 2020)? There has been an ongoing debate for decades about the potential benefits and harms of pornography, but the bulk of the literature reveals that for adolescents, such exposure can be harmful (Rothman, 2021). For example, exposure to adolescent pornography has been linked to permissive sexual attitudes (Doornwaard et al., 2015), dominant or aggressive sexual behaviors (Wright et al., 2021), self-objectification and comparison (Maheux et al., 2021), and the development of sexual scripts influenced by pornography (Bryant, 2010).

Moreover, the average age of first exposure to pornography is between 11 and 12 years old (Kraus & Rosenberg, 2014; Rothman, 2021). 11-year-olds may or may not have a cognitive understanding of sex and healthy sexuality. For those who don’t, exposure to pornographic videos (especially videos of violent, forced, group, or rough sex acts) can be traumatic. These young people may not have a precise vision of sex compared to what they see actors playing in pornographic videos. They may not have a schema (or mental representation or category) that informs them that what they are seeing is unrealistic, unethical, illegal, or abnormal. Lack of healthy sexuality can make exposure to pornography distressing or disturbing as children try to process what they have seen (“Is this sex?”).

Additionally, adolescent brains go through critical periods of development and brain restructuring (pruning), and they may be more susceptible and sensitive to the impact of pornography than adults (Brown & Wisco, 2019). Indeed, the highly gratifying nature of pornography (exciting, arousing, pleasurable) can, for some teens, lead to loss of control over pornography use, compulsive use, and use that results in negative consequences. Indeed, among young adult male participants, 21.61% reported needing to increase the amount or intensify the nature of pornography to achieve the same level of arousal (suggesting tolerance; Jacobs et al., 2021)

Finally, conditioning one’s arousal response with online pornography can alter one’s experience of arousal with offline sexual partners (Barrett, 2010; Carnes, 2001; Doidge, 2007; Hilton, 2013). Indeed, some research suggests that problematic pornography use is associated with sexual dysfunction (Jacobs et al., 2021). Therefore, while not all young people who view pornography experience these negative consequences, there is potential for harm to some young people.

What can we do?

Adolescent brains are in a period of development in which the rational and problem-solving front part of the brain (prefrontal cortex) is not as connected as the emotional and rewarding part of the midbrain (limbic region) due to a process called myelination (Ashwell, 2019; Volkow and Boyle, 2018). As a result, adolescents have an increased sensitivity to rewarding behaviors (such as drug use, pornography, gambling, etc.) and often need help with rational, goal-oriented problem solving, which is not not happen as quickly as reward processing. .

Therefore, parents and guardians can provide assistance in helping teens navigate the highly rewarding online world. Here are some suggestions:

  1. In light of the average age of first exposure to pornography, talk with your child early about what they might encounter online and what they should do when they see it (“On the Internet, you can see things you don’t understand, like photos or videos of people with no clothes on, doing things you’ve never seen before. If you come across any of these photos or videos, come tell me and we can talk about it.”
  2. Provide education about pornography and the differences between pornography and healthy, consensual sexual activity (realism of pornography, actors, objectification of men and women, body enhancement, harms of violence, importance of consent).
  3. Use technological blocking and filtering systems to reduce the risk of exposure to unwanted pornography in your home or on your child’s device. Reduce the amount of time your child uses a device alone and make internet use a family activity instead.
  4. Talk to your child about sexuality, healthy sexual behaviors, sexual curiosity, and the values ​​you would like to instill in them when it comes to sex. Without these open, non-evaluative, safe, and non-judgmental dialogues, children will turn to other sources as their “teachers,” who may or may not be helpful and adaptive.

The landscape of child and adolescent development continues to change with the evolution of technology. It is important that the caregivers in their lives are informed, engaged and proactive in encouraging healthy development in our young people.

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Why has America always been obsessed with baby boomers? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/why-has-america-always-been-obsessed-with-baby-boomers/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 14:40:46 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/why-has-america-always-been-obsessed-with-baby-boomers/ Since the birth of the first baby boomer (in Philadelphia, one minute after midnight on January 1, 1946), America has had a fixation on generation, as the history of the group makes clear. Examining every aspect of the generation that would become known as baby boomers immediately became a national concern among critics, an observation […]]]>

Since the birth of the first baby boomer (in Philadelphia, one minute after midnight on January 1, 1946), America has had a fixation on generation, as the history of the group makes clear. Examining every aspect of the generation that would become known as baby boomers immediately became a national concern among critics, an observation repeated over the years. “No generation in history has ever been more richly analyzed, dramatized, mythologized and anguished than the baby boomers,” wrote Tom Wolfe in the American viewer in 1990, thinking that “myth is not too pompous a word for the aura that shone around them”.

For some, the generation looked like a different animal species, with something entirely new about them. Baby boomers “grew up at a time when there was so much fat in the American economy that teenagers and 20-somethings could get their hands on enough money to create their own lifestyles,” he said. observed the novelist and student of American culture. , these styles having “distinctive codes of dress and decor (and language)”.

Proponents of baby boomers, such as University of Georgia demographer and sociologist Doug Bachtel, have argued that the generation rightfully deserves much of the credit for civil rights, women’s rights and environmental movements. “We made the world different, mostly for the better,” Bachtel (a baby boomer) said in 2001, an idea echoed by Cheryl Russell. “Baby boomers can be best appreciated for the social changes that have occurred – the [greater] equality for women and minorities,” she said (also a baby boomer), believing that “we have set in motion a more tolerant society.”

Embracing a college education was another important contribution the generation made to American society, Russell believed, especially for women. In 1950, only one-third of female high school graduates went on to college, but two decades later that number had risen to almost 70%.

Not only recognized experts, but everyday people have come to the defense of baby boomers when they have been attacked in one way or another. In 2001, for example, a critic wrote in the New York Times that the generation was ‘culturally fixed’, ‘fatty’, ‘sufficient’ and ‘lazy’, a good reason for them to be ‘self-loathing’. One reader, Brent Green from Denver, was quick to point out key contributions baby boomers have made over the years, including building the digital economy and kickstarting the longest economic recovery in the world. American history.

While the twenties were considered the star of online technology at the time, Green reminded readers that baby boomers led the way in creating the personal computer, operating systems software and the Internet. Beyond that, baby boomers had waged “a war on obscure values ​​and a hegemonic political and social power structure,” Green continued, leading to diminished government and corporate sovereignty and a society much more egalitarian in terms of gender and race.

Of course, not everyone feels that what baby boomers gave exceeded or even equaled what they took. “The sheer size of the cohort made it important, economically and therefore culturally, and personal importance was its defining attitude,” wrote conservative columnist George F. Will in the Washington Post a few months later, summarizing the primary collective trait of baby boomers as “endless narcissism.”

Many Americans apparently agreed. When asked in a 2009 Zogby Interactive poll what the generation’s historic legacy would be, 42% of the nearly 5,000 adults polled said “using in an era of consumerism and self-indulgence”. While 27% of respondents answered “help bring about a lasting change in social and cultural values ​​and end a war”, 11% answered “nothing at all, nothing really special”, which is not not a particularly enthusiastic endorsement either.

The Zogby poll was timed to coincide with Woodstock’s 40th anniversary, an ideal time to reflect on what baby boomers had achieved after that seminal event. Like Steve Kluger of USA today noted as thousands gathered in Bethel to celebrate what happened there in 1969, the anniversary sparked a wave of boomer bashing — ironic given Woodstock’s message and peace demonstration , solidarity and belonging.

The usual complaints – baby boomers were destroying social security, taking jobs away from young people, monopolizing the housing market by refusing to move into retirement communities, telling their own stories until they were sick and, most egregiously, remaining alive – were widely disseminated. Although unfortunate, Kluger told readers, the antagonism and hostility directed at the generation was less than the progress that had been made. “The Boomer legacy remains vibrant,” he wrote, convinced that “the seeds were all there in Woodstock.”

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More than masks affecting the mental health of young people: letters http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/more-than-masks-affecting-the-mental-health-of-young-people-letters/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 10:10:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/more-than-masks-affecting-the-mental-health-of-young-people-letters/ February 16 — To the editor: At a recent local school board meeting, disturbing statistics about youth mental health were shared. Statistics have indicated an increase in depression, anxiety and suicide rates among young people over the past two years. It is true that children have experienced more depression and anxiety during the pandemic. It […]]]>

February 16 — To the editor:

At a recent local school board meeting, disturbing statistics about youth mental health were shared. Statistics have indicated an increase in depression, anxiety and suicide rates among young people over the past two years. It is true that children have experienced more depression and anxiety during the pandemic. It is also true that suicide rates and suicidal thoughts increased during this time. These trends have certainly been reflected in my practice of psychology, so I wasn’t shocked to hear the statistics.

I was, however, shocked to hear an attempt to reduce the current state of young people’s mental health to a single cause: mask-wearing. To claim that mask-wearing has caused a drastic increase in anxiety, depression, and suicide is misinformed and misleading at best. At worst, it is deliberately misleading and manipulative. The basics of scientific research tell us that two factors being related does not mean that one causes the other. Countless factors have contributed to young people’s mental health issues since Covid began. Separation from friends and family, coping with illness and loss of loved ones, not being able to visit hospitalized family, and anxiety about getting sick are just a few factors I hear speak in my practice that have had an impact on depression and anxiety rates. I have also heard many children say that wearing a mask has contributed to their difficulties over the past two years. That said, for some children who wanted to feel safer interacting and learning in person with their peers, wearing a mask helped alleviate anxiety and depression. It is clear that the complex experiences our children have endured during the pandemic cannot be reduced to simple causal relationships. They’ve been through a lot, and each child has gone through the past two years in a unique way.

As Covid numbers continue to improve in our area, it looks like mask mandates will soon be lifted. I look forward to a time when our children can interact safely without being masked. We will take a step closer to our pre-pandemic way of life. When that time comes, it will be important to recognize that our children have been through a difficult time in which countless variables have impacted their mental health. Wearing a mask, while certainly a factor, wasn’t the only cause of anything. Viewing mask-wearing as the root cause of their distress is misguided and risks downplaying other factors that have impacted our children over the past two years.

Christopher W. Griffith, Psy.D

Certified psychologist

Resident and relative of Newfields

Get to know the Rye Town and School Candidates February 24

February 15 – To the editor:

February 24 at 7 p.m. the Rye Civic League and the Rye Public Library are once again hosting a Candidates Night for all five races run in 2022. The Library still has a Covid capacity limit, so only Candidates will be in person, everyone else can see the streams of City Hall or the Zoom link (on your Rye Civic News and Rye Civic League website).

Questions should be submitted to the Rye Civic League (civicnews@ryecivicleague.org) by the 24th as they will be printed for city moderator Bob Eaton. Time permitting, additional questions can be submitted via Zoom chat.

The contested races are Joanne Meyer and Karen Oliver for the role of six-year supervisor of the role of the checklist. Victor Azzi and John Hart are competing for the only seat on the library’s board of trustees. Three people, Jennifer Madden, John Mitchell and Sandra Chororos, are competing for the one-year seat on the Zoning Board of Adjustment. For Select Board, Bill Epperson and Cathy Hodson are competing for the three-year post. The school board has two vacant seats and three competing candidates, Katherine Errecart, Danielle Maxwell and Susan Ross.

The Rye Election will be held March 8 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Rye Elementary School.

Steven Borne

Rye

Vote for Epperson, Rye Board of Selectman!

February 12 – To the editor:

I worked on town councils and committees with Bill Epperson for a decade – on the beach committee, long range planning and the planning board. This is only a small part of his commitments to the city. He has also served on the Heritage Committee, the Capital Improvement Plan Committee and is currently Chairman of the Board.

Protecting and maintaining critical water sources, such as aquifers, wetlands and coastlines, is a priority. It creates and supports strict regulations to ensure that these resources will be there not only for our children, but also for our child-children. He focuses on this not for personal gain, but for the betterment of our community.

We reviewed and rewrote many aspects of the city master plan. In doing so, it emphasizes the integration of known facts, science, education, research and experience. It also ensures consistency with the opinions expressed by citizens across the city.

Bill was patient throughout the planning board process. Many applications require months of consideration. Throughout, he remains focused on legal compliance, obligations and fairness. I often find myself looking through the prescriptions, only to have Bill quote the layout of the memory code.

His institutional knowledge of the City is, at present, unmatched. He has lived in Rye for 44 years. Throughout this time, he has been involved, passionate and thoughtful. I often joked with him that his civic responsibilities require more time than a full-time job, it’s a way of life.

Vote for Bill Epperson for Rye Board of Selectman!

Katy Sherman

Rye

Pease cargo facility will negatively impact the lives of Seacoast residents

February 13 — To the editor:

I was impressed with Dr. Clinton Miller’s paper (February 8) on the negative effects of a freight facility at Pease.

It would no doubt be ‘noisy, dirty and negatively affect Portsmouth’s quality of life’.

Please reconsider this project.

Anne Donaldson

Portsmouth

Preferential Choice Voting Would Be Good for New Hampshire

February 13 – To the editor:

The NH House Election Law Committee is considering a bill to introduce Preferential Choice Voting (RCV) to New Hampshire. This is an enabling bill that would allow municipalities to opt in to the use of RCV for their elections and would allow parties to opt in to the use of RCV for primary elections, including the presidential primary.

The objective of the RCV is to elect a candidate who receives more than 50% of the votes. Voters can rank candidates in order of preference. For example, in a race with multiple candidates, you can select your first, second, and third choice, and so on. If a candidate wins more than 50% of the vote, that person wins. However, if no candidate wins more than 50% of the vote, the election proceeds to an instant ballot. The candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. If this candidate was your first choice, then your second choice counts. If, again, no candidate wins more than 50%, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and if that was your next choice, then your third choice will count. This continues until one candidate wins over 50% of the vote.

RCV is an improvement over the “first-past-the-post” system we currently use, as it allows voters to vote according to their conscience, rather than voting for the perceived party favorite or the lesser of two evils. It gives voters more choices and more votes. This system is already in use in many countries and in many jurisdictions, US courts have consistently upheld CVR as constitutional. Courts have ruled that RCV gives every voter an equal vote. “Each voter has the same opportunity to rank the candidates when they vote, and in each round, each voter’s vote has the same value.”

The RCV is more representative of the will of the people than our current system. It eliminates voice splitting and the spoiler effect. This discourages negative campaigning and allows the political process to focus on what unites us rather than what divides us. Ultimately, RCV can help heal a divided society. To show your support for RCV, please sign the petition at www.nhrankedchoice.org For great artwork, visit www.fairvote.org

Jeanne Hambet

Portsmouth

State Representative NH Rockingham District 31 (Greenland, Newington, North Hampton, Portsmouth Ward 3)

Collective guilt? No. Collective responsibility? Yes.

February 15 – To the editor:

Germany, on the 50th anniversary of the Holocaust, struggled to come to terms with its violent and racist history with historical exhibitions, theater and art productions, books and talks. The unofficial slogan of the citizens’ groups organizing the educational effort was “Collective guilt? No! Collective responsibility? Yes!”

Today, teaching the subject of the Holocaust is compulsory in German schools. Additionally, almost all students have visited a concentration camp or a Holocaust museum. The effort to learn, take responsibility and move forward continues.

One hundred and fifty years after the Emancipation Proclamation, America continues to whitewash and make excuses for its racist history by limiting discussion of it in our public schools. NH is one of six states that has passed bills limiting how teachers can discuss racist and systemic inequalities, while directing them to promote the story of our exceptional goodness as a nation.

It is not a program that will serve our students well. Wounds from unexamined pasts tend to fester and prevent healing in the present. Although it is not always comfortable, in order to prepare our young people for a better future, we must be honest about our past and continue the tentative steps we take towards justice and reconciliation.

Teachers should be allowed to teach facts, rather than idealized versions of them that only serve the interests of a particular group.

Cynthia Muse

Rye

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Dr. Julie Smith: “Mental health is no different from physical health. No one is safe’ | Psychology http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dr-julie-smith-mental-health-is-no-different-from-physical-health-no-one-is-safe-psychology/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 21:36:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dr-julie-smith-mental-health-is-no-different-from-physical-health-no-one-is-safe-psychology/ Dr Julie Smith, 37, is a clinical psychologist who has a private practice in Hampshire and spent 10 years working for the NHS. In November 2019, she started make TikToks containing clear and engaging advice on various mental health issues. She has more than 3 million followers and in January published her first book, Why […]]]>

Dr Julie Smith, 37, is a clinical psychologist who has a private practice in Hampshire and spent 10 years working for the NHS. In November 2019, she started make TikToks containing clear and engaging advice on various mental health issues. She has more than 3 million followers and in January published her first book, Why hasn’t anyone told me this before?which spent four weeks at the top of bestseller lists.

There are many self-help books published; why do you think yours struck a chord?
I think people like that it’s evidence-based. I’m a clinical psychologist, so the things I put in there have been vetted with the latest research and they’re things that are taught to people in therapy, depending on why they’re going to therapy. These are also life skills that we can all use.

Everyone has had days when their mood is lower than they would like or days when they deal with more stress, grief or anxiety – all those normal human feelings that can hold us back or be difficult. to manage if we don’t have the right skills. Also, we just went through a pandemic and I think a lot of people are asking, “How can I get out of this?”

How did you transition to social media and TikTok?
When I offered psychological therapies, I found that many people were unaware that part of the therapy was educational. You talk a lot and work through your problems, but you also learn a bit about how your mind works, how you can influence your mood and emotional state, and how you can then affect your mental health on a day-to-day basis.

People found this educational aspect so empowering that there was a change in their ability to manage their mental health on a day-to-day basis. So I would come home and say to my husband that this stuff should be more available, that people shouldn’t have to come to me to find out the basics, and he said, “Well, come on. y, make it available. Put it on YouTube or something like that.

Giving people tools is cognitive behavioral therapy, right?
There is a mix in there. I tried to save it for everyday tools. I was very careful about this distinction: “It’s the educational element of therapy, it’s not therapy.” These are tools you can use today and tomorrow, but the book is not a therapist.

Social media is often blamed for young people’s mental health issues, especially self-esteem and anxiety
Part of my videos were to remind people that what they see on social media isn’t always real. Being aware when they spend time with certain content of how they feel and using social media to enhance their lives rather than deprive them of it.

Social media behavior such as ghosting, trolling or blockage can be painful. What advice do you give to people who find being online quite brutal?
It’s about recognizing that you have the power to choose. You have a choice of how much time you spend online, you have a choice of who you follow and who you don’t, and what content you engage with. When you embark on a mindless scroll, you may feel like you have no choice.

So my videos are really about reminding people and helping them realize – that if it’s affecting you in a negative way, you’re one step away from something different.

There’s a line that runs often that generation Z and millennials are more prone to mental health issues than they are basically snowflakes. How about that?
It’s not something I would engage with at all. Mental health is, for me, no different from physical health. No one is immune. If you take someone and start messing with their core defenses, like sleep, routine, social connections, nutrition, and exercise, that person will become vulnerable to physical and mental health issues.

I think more and more people are starting to realize this now and it helps to fight the stigma around mental health. It’s a much healthier way to look at it.

So people are just better at naming things these days, rather than actually being more fragile?
You are not more physically fragile to talk about your physical wounds. There are no more broken legs just from being cast now. It’s going in the right direction, but you’ll always have backlash, that’s how change happens.

“Metacognition” is the key concept of your book; why is it important?
It is a kind of reflection on your thoughts. This is one of the main tools we use in therapy – being able to step back from your thought processes and observe them. By doing this, you get to see them for what they are.

People often think of therapy as changing your thoughts. In fact, you can’t decide what thoughts will pop into your head – it just happens. The little you can choose is how much airtime you give to each thought.

You seem to have a weakness for positive thinking. Is positive thinking a bad thing?
Positive thoughts are good, they are not bad. But there is this kind of movement online around only positive vibes; don’t let the negative thoughts be there. If you have this standard for yourself, as soon as negative thoughts that you cannot control begin to appear, you begin to feel like you are failing or not being positive enough. That you are not enough in general. It makes you feel worse.

So therapy is often about accepting thoughts as they come, and then making choices about what to do with them. If I spend time with these thoughts, will it help me get where I want to go? Or if I spend time with these, what different impact does it have? This allows your brain to find whatever it comes up with and then choose what to do next.

There’s a chapter in your book called “How do you get yourself to do something when you don’t feel like it?”. We have all been there. What is the answer?
There are always things you don’t want to do. There is something that is taught in a therapy called Dialectical Behavior Therapy, DBT for short, which is the opposite action. Mindfulness is a really helpful part of that, where you become aware of the urges to take action. Thus, each feeling will give you a desire to do or not to do something. And often you’ll feel the feeling and you’re going to do the thing and you haven’t really separated the want and the action – you’re doing it all at once.

Julie Smith has 3 million followers on TikTok. Photography: @drjuliesmith/tiktok

But what you can do is start to become aware of a craving and start to recognize that you don’t have to act on it: you can act on the opposite of it. It becomes a tool you can use in those little moments that seem insignificant, but add up.

How do you think your content might change as we (hopefully) leave the pandemic behind us?
I don’t imagine for a minute that because the lockdowns ended the psychological fallout. People face huge losses. Not only where people have lost family members and friends, but also where they have lost their livelihoods, their jobs, their financial security, their homes, a sense of security when they go out. There are tremendous amounts of change that will continue for people.

The cost of the therapy puts it out of reach for most people and its availability is limited on the NHS. How do you reconcile that with the increase in the number of people showing up?
That’s part of why the book seemed like such a timely thing to do. I can’t give everyone individual therapy, but I can do something. I can share basic education as widely as possible.

I had no interest in being a public person or being on social media – it was really about sharing this information. And it was hard to do. I have three kids and a job and what kept me going was the feedback. It’s just overwhelming. Every day, people send a message saying, “Thank you very much. It makes a difference. It’s not an ideal world and I don’t have all the answers, but I can help.

  • Why hasn’t anyone told me this before? by Dr Julie Smith is published by Michael Joseph (£14.99). To support the Guardian and Observer order your copy at guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply

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Experts warn of another dangerous TikTok trend http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/experts-warn-of-another-dangerous-tiktok-trend/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 11:06:04 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/experts-warn-of-another-dangerous-tiktok-trend/ FRANKLIN — A dangerous new trend is emerging on the social media site, TikTok, and health experts want parents and caregivers to know what’s out there. According to a recent report from Good Morning America, a new TikTok trend could lead to more teens self-diagnosing themselves with rare and serious mental disorders. The video app […]]]>

FRANKLIN — A dangerous new trend is emerging on the social media site, TikTok, and health experts want parents and caregivers to know what’s out there.

According to a recent report from Good Morning America, a new TikTok trend could lead to more teens self-diagnosing themselves with rare and serious mental disorders. The video app seems to have more and more videos of young people claiming to have rare borderline, bipolar or identity personality disorders. Videos with these hashtags have been viewed millions of times.

Lindsey Wakefield is a psychology student at Franklin College in Johnson County, and while she said she’s not on the platform, she’s well aware of this growing trend based on conversations she had with peers and family members.

“For example, people post about a symptom they have that they say is part of ADHD, and I’m like, ‘Yeah, I can see that’s part of ADHD.’ And then later in the thread, people are like, ‘Oh my God, I have ADHD because I do this too,’ Wakefield said.

And some of the trendy mental health conditions are even rarer or more serious than ADHD.

“For example, one of my cousins ​​came up to me and said, ‘I think I have schizophrenia,’ and she was telling me about everything she was doing and I’m like, let’s calm down,” said said Wakefield. .

His professor of physiology, Jamie Bromley, teaches a course in abnormal psychology at Franklin College. She said some of these symptoms like nervousness or anxiety are normal feelings that we all experience at times, and that there is a range from typical to things that have a big impact on your daily life. .

She said these videos can often be inaccurate and many highlight disorders that are extremely rare in the population. She even encourages her students not to try to self-diagnose or diagnose others, as this is still an undergraduate course and it takes more knowledge and experience to give a diagnosis.

“So it takes a lot of training and a lot of experience to be able to diagnose, so the only people who can really provide a psychological diagnosis are licensed professionals,” Bromley said.

Bromley said that with social media becoming an increasing part of life, there is more and more research into the psychological impacts of these sites, especially on young people and it is always a topic of discussion in his classes at the college.

“How does it affect, you know, cognitive processes, emotional behavior, and what are the long-term effects, you know, both positive and negative,” Bromley said.

Wakefield is an avid reader and said she doesn’t have a lot of time to spend on social media sites and can see how it adds to procrastination and how it can be dangerous for young people. She said growing up they had pretty open communication at home about what was happening on the web, but she recalls that a big part of maintaining her online sanity during her teenage years was friends who supported her.

“Having friends around you like those who know what you’re getting into and having those affirmation buddies to make sure you don’t go overboard, or if you are, they’re there to help you out,” Wakefield said. .

Bromley adds that parents need to be aware of social media platforms, what’s on them, and strive to maintain an open line of communication with their children and teens.

“And if they’re trying to figure something out through self-diagnosis, maybe something is going on, but maybe not this rare disorder that they self-diagnosed,” Bromley said. “Maybe they’re having symptoms of depression or symptoms of anxiety and they need support.”

Bromley said for caregivers, it’s important to set boundaries based on age and maturity. Help your child set boundaries. Help them learn to resist social pressures. They need allies to do this, so encourage them to talk to you about what’s going on in their lives, including their mental health.

She said research shows that the more young children engage with social media, the more problematic it can be and it’s important to make all those decisions as a family, like when kids can get their first phone and when they’ll be. allowed on these social media. platforms.

As for Wakefield, she is about to earn a major in psychology and a minor in Spanish from Franklin College and is currently applying for graduate programs.

She hopes to use her upbringing to eventually help members of the Spanish-speaking community get the help and support they need to overcome trauma. She said that through her internships, she sees a need for more of these services and advocates in minority communities and hopes that one day she can help provide the best care for people in these communities in central Indiana. .

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Can mobile phone apps improve your mental health? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-mobile-phone-apps-improve-your-mental-health/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:49:51 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-mobile-phone-apps-improve-your-mental-health/ The mental health apps industry is booming, but scientists and clinicians are questioning whether these apps are safe and effective. A meta-review of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health shows limited evidence of their overall effectiveness, but the results are “strongly suggestive” of some benefits. Other research shows that when used appropriately, some mental health […]]]>

  • The mental health apps industry is booming, but scientists and clinicians are questioning whether these apps are safe and effective.
  • A meta-review of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health shows limited evidence of their overall effectiveness, but the results are “strongly suggestive” of some benefits.
  • Other research shows that when used appropriately, some mental health apps can enhance the therapeutic process.

Venture capitalists and online developers are taking advantage of the growing demand for therapeutic apps and other mobile phone interventions for mental health.

In fact, the mental health apps market is expected to exceed $3.3 billion by 2027, marking an annual growth rate of 20.5% from 2021. According to the American Psychological Association (APA)the growing interest of private equity firms investing in mental health apps has been largely fueled by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recent reports suggest up to 20,000 Mental health apps exist today, with Headspace and Calm among the most widely used options.

But whether mental health apps and text-based interventions actually work remains to be seen.

A meta-review published in January 2022 looked at the effectiveness of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health symptoms, including:

The review included the results of 14 meta-analyses with 47,940 participants in 145 randomized controlled trials. The authors looked at a wide range of mobile phone-based interventions, such as:

Virtual therapy visits with mental health professionals were not part of the study.

Based on the data analyzed, the researchers found no convincing evidence that cellphone-based interventions effectively treated people’s symptoms.

However, the results showed “highly suggestive evidence” that cellphone-based interventions had the potential to improve anxiety, depression and stress. They also suggested that SMS interventions could help people quit smoking. The researchers recommended that more research be conducted to explore these avenues.

Simon B. GoldbergPhD, assistant professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and lead author of the study, said that while previous research suggests some benefits for smartphone-based interventions, the therapeutic alliance between client and advisor continues to be beneficial for overall efficiency.

“I suspect that humans simply react more strongly to interpersonal influences from living humans than to fully or partially automated technology,” Goldberg told Psych Central.

“Human connection is especially powerful, especially when dealing with mental health issues.”

As the technology for smartphone-based interventions continues to develop, Goldberg said the methods may yield better results. For example, machine learning-based algorithms could personalize content to tailor an individual’s therapeutic experience.

“It’s also possible that these interventions are only moderately effective on average,” Goldberg said, adding that some interventions, like CBT-based applications, may be more effective than others.

“It still allows for the possibility that some people will benefit a lot (while others will benefit very little), as well as the possibility that the technologies will be a useful first line of assistance or prevention.”

C.Vaile WrightPhD, senior director of healthcare innovation at APA, said one of the biggest challenges in the field of mental health apps is the lack of standardization and regulation, which includes research, rigorous testing and verification.

As such, some critics have called the mental health app industry “Wild West therapy.”

“As a consumer, it can be really difficult to figure out what’s good and what’s not, and then what’s effective and what’s not effective,” Wright said over the phone.

Many mental health apps aren’t grounded in psychological science, with some spreading false mental health information or leading to undesirable results.

According to Wright, possible risks associated with mental health apps can include anything from increasing symptomatology to disabling the therapeutic process.

“That would probably be our biggest concern — not that it doesn’t help at all, but that it actually hurts,” Wright said.

Goldberg’s study notes that mobile phone-based interventions could be considered a cost-effective way to reduce mental health symptoms and help people quit smoking.

He also notes that more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these interventions for today’s digitally-focused youth.

According to Wright, mental health apps might be more helpful to “digital natives,” like young people and teens, compared to some adults. She said other groups who are less likely to seek traditional therapies, such as men, could also benefit.

“Similarly, for individuals in communities of color, this could be an intervention that connects some of that health equity gapadded Wright. “But I don’t think we know that right now.”

Other advantages

With mental illness affecting Tens of millions in the United States each year, mental health apps have the potential to reach wider populations than traditional psychotherapy.

Wright said that even before the pandemic, the field of mental health care was facing a labor shortage, leading to a large number of unmet needs for mental health interventions.

“We need to think more innovatively about how we are going to approach the public health of our country – and I think technology is a clear path for us to do that because it is more accessible; because it can be more affordable,” she said.

Like a recent APA article notes, mental health apps may also get more people into therapy.

Wright said mental health apps could also help break down stigma-related barriers because you can use them with a degree of anonymity, compared to a visit to a psychotherapist’s office.

It’s important to note that mental health apps are not designed to replace a conversation with a therapist or medical treatment. Some people use both together, and research from 2020 suggests that mental health apps can enhance the face-to-face therapeutic process with a professional.

Wright said as a consumer, it’s a good idea to do your homework before trying any mental health apps. Websites like One Mind Psyber Guide Rate and review different mental health apps to provide you with more information than just relying on star ratings in the app store.

You may also want to know how a mental health app will use your data and if it is sold or protected.

“The wellness app space is an unregulated area,” Wright said. “That means nobody tells them they have to protect your private health information from hackers, so it becomes really critical that consumers read the fine print.”

Despite the volume of existing research, therapeutic applications and other text-based technologies are still relatively new and constantly being improved.

While the overall effectiveness of these technologies for mental health issues remains questionable, there are also consistent evidence that they can provide a modest benefit.

“This could still have a major impact on public health, although a certain proportion of users need more intensive intervention to benefit,” Goldberg said.

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Landmark study shows rise in online sexual blackmail during pandemic http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/landmark-study-shows-rise-in-online-sexual-blackmail-during-pandemic/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 09:58:51 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/landmark-study-shows-rise-in-online-sexual-blackmail-during-pandemic/ Credit: Unsplash/CC0 public domain During the pandemic, men were twice as likely as women to fall victim to online extortionists threatening to post explicit photos, videos and information about them. That’s according to a new study, the first of its kind, published in the peer-reviewed journal Victims and Offenders. Young people, black and Native American […]]]>

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 public domain

During the pandemic, men were twice as likely as women to fall victim to online extortionists threatening to post explicit photos, videos and information about them.

That’s according to a new study, the first of its kind, published in the peer-reviewed journal Victims and Offenders.

Young people, black and Native American women, and LGBTQ people were also at higher risk of this cybercrime (known as sextortion), the survey of more than 2,000 adults in the United States showed.

Sextortion is a form of extortion in which the blackmailer threatens to post explicit and private images or videos online unless their demands are met.

The abuser can be a current or former partner, a stranger who hacked into someone’s photos or webcam, or an online dating scammer.

Reports of sextortion at the FBI have increased during the pandemic, a time of significant transition to a more digital life through remote work and socializing, researchers say.

Since the start of the pandemic, nonprofit organizations, government institutions, and legal professionals in the United States have also reported a substantial increase in technology-facilitated sexual violence.

But while other forms of technology-enabled sexual violence, such as non-consensual pornography (sometimes called “revenge”), have been the subject of increasing research in recent years, sextortion has received less attention. ‘Warning.

Funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to Florida International University (FIU) and the Cyber ​​Civil Rights Initiative (CCRI), the study asked 2,006 people if they had ever experienced sextortion, defined as “the act of threatening to display a nude or sexually explicit image in order to get a person to do something such as send more nude or sexually explicit images, pay someone money, or perform sexual acts.”

4.5% of men and 2.3% of women said they had been victims of sextortion since the start of the pandemic.

This surprised the researchers, who expected women to be most at risk.

“There are several reasons why American men more often reported being victims of sextortion during the pandemic than women,” explains researcher Dr. Asia Eaton, associate professor of psychology at CRF and head of research at CCRI.

“Recent research has highlighted gender disparities in unpaid care work and domestic work since the start of the pandemic; it is possible that men have had more time to spend online than women during the pandemic.”

Men’s tendency to be “less selective” than women when dating can also open them up to sextortion, adds Dr Eaton, who notes that men are more likely to fall victim to online romance scams in general.

The results also revealed race- and sexuality-related differences in rates of sextortion, with black women, Native American women and LGBTQ people — three groups at greater risk of other types of sexual violence and coercion — also more at risk of sextortion.

Black and Native American women were about seven times more likely to be victims of sextortion than white women. Rates among LGBTQ respondents were up to three times higher than among heterosexual people.

Age was also a factor, with higher rates among 18-29 year olds, possibly due to greater sexual experimentation and use of technology in this age group.

The study also found that people who had experienced sexual violence from a partner before the pandemic were more likely to experience sextortion during the pandemic.

Sextortion was most often perpetrated by strangers and dating partners, current and former.

The study authors say more work is needed to determine why the risk of sextortion varies by race, age, gender and sexual orientation, as well as its impact on people’s well-being.

It is possible, for example, that sextortion has a more detrimental impact on women, although they are less often targeted than men.

Researchers conclude that questions about technology-facilitated sexual violence should be added to tests used by clinical professionals to help identify patients who are in abusive relationships before referring them to counseling and other forms of counseling. aid.

Prevention is also important. “Sex education programs that teach about consent, pleasure, and communication and decision-making in healthy relationships can reduce both in-person and technology-facilitated sexual violence,” says Dr. Eaton.

Limitations of the study include that the data consists of self-reports only and was just collected in the first year of the pandemic.


‘Sextortion’ Leads to Financial Loss and Psychological Trauma: What to Look for on Dating Apps


More information:
Asia A. Eaton et al, The Relationship between Sextortion during COVID-19 and Pre-pandemic Intimate Partner Violence: A Large, Study of Victimization among Diverse US Men and Women, Victims and Offenders (2022). DOI: 10.1080/15564886.2021.2022057

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